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飞思CR2于JPG格式图片色差问题

Kommentare

28 Kommentare

  • h4ste

    If necessary, please contact my email or reply here. I can send the original picture to facilitate your research.

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  • Brian Jordan
    Moderator

    Just to confirm, this isn't the support desk.  You've posted to a community forum.  Someone here may be able to help.  As English is the language most commonly spoken here, you might get more input if you can adjust the language on your Capture One screenshots to English then re-post.  Also, people here find it much easier to reply to you if you change your profile name from FirstName LastName to something unique.  Way too many FN LN here to try to figure out which is you.

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    I would expect the CR2 version to have less contrast and less saturation than the JPG out of camera. 

    The CR2 file is a representation of the raw data that the camera sensor produced. It will have had some adjustment applied by default by Capture One. But because it is a raw file, you must expect to do some work on it in Capture One to make it look the way you want. 

    The JPG image is (I assume) what the camera has produced. The camera itself will have done some processing on it with things like contrast, saturation, sharpening, etc, to try to give a good straight-out-of camera look. 

    You may want the final output you get from the CR2 to look just like the JPG, or you may not. For instance you may want the background to be very white. You could achieve that by moving the handle own the levels tool from 255 to a lower value.

    But you may not want that - the point of using raw is that it gives you choices.

    Which version gives you the most accurate shade of blue for the jeans only you can decide. But with the CR2 version you can adjust it to look the way you want it to, perhaps using the two sliders in the White balance tool, and perhaps the saturation tool.

    Or you could use the basic tab on the Color Editor tool. If the colour of the jeans in the JPG is what you want you could use the blue adjustment on that tool, reduce the saturation of blue a bit, move the hue slightly to the right, and perhaps reduce the lightness of the blue a little too.

    So... if you want it to look like the JPG, you could just use the JPG. If you want something else you have a lot of things you can adjust to get it how you want it.

    Ian

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  • h4ste

    What I need is to try to import it into Capture One so that the color difference can be the smallest instead of adjusting the jpg later, such as the icc color in Phase One, but after I set it up, it did not apply to the pictures I used. So I hope that the images imported by Captureone can be displayed the same as those displayed in Canon's official software and photoshop, without any adjustments.

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  • h4ste

    Because I will use it to process a lot of pictures, but I cannot calibrate the color difference one by one. The color difference between jpg and cr2 formats in other software will be much smaller than in captureone. If this color difference problem can be solved, then captureone is a very good choice.

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    The first question to ask yourself is whether the CR2 or the JPG file looks more like how the jeans actually look in real life. 

    Ian

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    By the way, Forum Feedback is the wrong place for this post. Forum Feedback is intended for discussion of issues relating to the forum itself. I've moved this to a more suitable section.

    Ian

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  • h4ste

    Thank you, I will save the jpg later for color grading. The real thing is close to the JPG.

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    By the way, I see you are using the Generic ICC profile. Have you tried switching to the ProStandard one?

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  • h4ste

    我试过了,但是他还是存在色差,我在Digital Photo Professional 4中 CR2和JPG是没有色差的如图

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  • h4ste

    I tried it, but it still has chromatic aberration. In Digital Photo Professional 4, there is no chromatic aberration between CR2 and JPG, as shown in the figure.

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  • h4ste

    But in Capture one, I need to adjust the values ​​​​to get close to the real thing, but this will be more inconvenient, because we will have many pictures in one shot. If I have to calibrate the color difference one by one, this will increase my workload. 
    quantity.

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    If you have a number of similar shots, you can adjust one and then copy the adjustments to all the others.

    Ian

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  • h4ste

    I haven't found a rule for its color cast, because for example, blue will become more vivid, and other colors, such as orange, will also have a slight color cast. There is no fixed rule, so I think this is not easy to solve. 
    At first I thought it was because I didn't set it up properly, such as the Adobe color space. This problem has been bothering me for a year. If you can help me solve it, I would be very grateful... because the DPP film guide speed is too slow.

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  • h4ste

    I have been using captureone for several years and it is very easy to use. I used to shoot more models. In recent years, we have shot tiles, but we often encounter color differences in customer reactions. By default, our tile white background should not have color differences. 
    Yes, I found out later that it was because my CR2 format and JPG were displayed differently in Phase One~~

     

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  • h4ste
    The pants I posted above are brighter in CR2 than JPG. However, the pink clothes in this picture are just the opposite, so it is difficult for me to set a default calibration camera parameter preset... to reduce their color difference.

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  • h4ste

    This is green clothes. The difference between CR2 and JPG after importing into Cattureone. They are both original films without any modification or editing.

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  • h4ste

    This is their performance in the histogram. We will find that they are also different.

     

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  • h4ste

    I uploaded the picture to this website, but because the restriction of this website does not allow uploading zip, so I uploaded it in jpg format. : You need to change the suffix to zip after downloading, and then you can unzip it.

     https://pomf2.lain.la/f/2iq61dtm.jpg
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  • h4ste

    I really hope to get your help, it will be really important for my future work!

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  • h4ste

    Dear experienced experts, can this be solved? If not, I can only use JPG.

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  • Walter Rowe
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    A JPG and RAW file will NEVER look the same straight out of camera. The JPG has in-camera settings applied to it. The RAW file has NO settings applied to it.

    Here are some options:

    1. Create a custom ICC profile on that set with that lighting. The X-Rite Color Checker Passport color sampler and ColorChecker software can do that. You have to apply that ICC profile in the Basic Characteristics tool.
    2. Capture one frame tethered, edit the image to be accurate, and set the Next Capture settings in the Tether panels to copy those adjustments to the next capture. This applies the adjustments in the style to the subsequent captures in that session.
    3. Edit one frame, create a custom style from those adjustments, and apply that style to the next captures. If you use that same setup often this might be the most efficient method to help you. It lets you have a consistent look from one session to another as long as you use the same camera and lighting settings.
    4. Use Nikon NX Studio to process the raw file. Nikon NX Studio can read and apply the in-camera adjustments coded into the raw file so the raw file looks closest to the in-camera JPG.

    No software other than Nikon NX Studio can read the in-camera settings and apply them to the raw file. You have to make adjustments yourself or use NX Studio which can read the adjustments you set in the camera.

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  • h4ste

    @Walter RoweThank you for your reply. This is what I want to solve now. This problem has been bothering me before. I thought it was because I didn't set it up properly. Now it seems that it is a problem with CR2 and JPG format itself. It seems that there is no better way now, the only option is to set a preset or ICC

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  • Walter Rowe
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    Correct. Raw files are just that - RAW .. unedited. The in-camera previews you see are not RAW. They are JPGs embedded in the raw files that have the in-camera adjustments applied to them. This can fool you into thinking the raw file will come out of the camera looking that way. Only NX Studio can do that. No other app can do that.

    NX Studio is free. You should download and try it just to see the difference. I don't recommend it as a production tool because it isn't as efficient as Capture One, but it will help you see the difference between a raw file with in-camera settings applied in software (NX Studio) vs a raw file with no settings applied (ie Capture One).

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  • h4ste

    @Walter Rowe Okay, I understand, then I try to find their patterns and create a suitable preset to complete my subsequent work. 
    What was strange to me before was that when using other applications, such as 1. 2345看图王, 2. Photoshop, 3. Digital Photo Professional, the CR2 and JPG display in these software would be closer than in CaptureOne.

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  • Walter Rowe
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    Those other apps might have been showing you the embedded JPG preview image. I can't speak for Digital Photo Pro. It might be more intelligent about applying in-camera settings. Most other apps probably show you the embedded JPG until you make adjustments.

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  • h4ste

    Okay thank you and wish you all the best  Walter Rowe 

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  • Denis Huk
    Admin

    hey h4ste i'm moving your post to another topic as this has nothing to do with forum feedback

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