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Previews of all photos take too long

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52 Kommentare

  • SFA

    @ Rob Du Mont

    +1 for every word of that post.

    I mostly follow the same Import process with the same opinions about performance.

    I totally agree with your observations about support and the challenges of helping people grow into it and then retaining them in some way.

    Likewise your opinion about a strong user community.

    And of course,most importantly, a speedy and complete recovery for William.

    2
  • William Scott

    Just came across this a year later.

     

    I'm getting increasingly frustrated with C1 for this reason. Even generating previews for 128 RAW files ( small Fuji ones from an X-T3 takes a long time. I calculate that to load and just preview say 500 files from their own location and not even moving them would take me about 20 minutes just to finish it's contortions and let me get on with it. This is amazingly bad!

    I've been discussing this for the last week and a bit with their tech support who are acting like this is something unheard of that they don't understand and are getting me to send them logs and images etc. I was really annoyed to find this is documented on here so long ago and yet no-one at their tech team just told me it was the way it is.

    I like a lot of things about C1 but I've reluctantly decided to go back to Adobe. There's just too many frustrations here. What a waste of money this has been for me.

    1
  • Rob DuMont

    Apologies in advance, this will be a long reply.

    I've encountered all sorts of performance issues over the years, and generally been able to resolve them.  Over that time I've gained a fairly in-depth view into how Sessions in particular work; my workflow doesn't work well with Catalogues. 

    With Sessions, Capture One maintains all metadata, adjustments, previews and thumbnails in a "CaptureOne" subfolder structure in the same location as images. Any folder that contains images, that you open in a Session, will have this subfolder.

    The main window usually displays Tools, the Viewer, and the Browser.  On Windows these are turned on and off with CTRL-T, CTRL-V, and CTRL-B respectively.  Probably CMD-T/V/B on Mac, you'd have to check.  This is an easy way for you to identify what I refer to below, if you're not familiar with these.

    When you browse to a folder in Sessions, it looks to see what images are in that folder, then it checks to see what supporting files are in the CaptureOne subfolder for each.  If you have the Browser open, it loads the thumbnail files for each, starting with the images currently displayed in the Browser.  If you have XMP files, it'll check those, too.  I believe it then syncs them if they don't match and that option's enabled.  If you have the Viewer open, it attempts to load the Preview Image for the selected image(s), but only if the preview image is larger in pixels than the Viewer area.  If the Viewer area is larger than the preview, or is zoomed in, then it will render the RAW file on the fly.  Rendering is done via OpenCL if that is enabled, or via your CPU if not.  This is slower than loading just the Preview.

    I suggest you:

    1. Create a brand-new Session.  Location is not important.
    2. In Capture One ... Preferences: turn off OpenCL hardware acceleration for Display. 
    3. Also in Preferences: Set Auto Sync sidecar XMP to None (I also have both "prefer ... XMP" options checked FWIW)*
    4. Also in Preferences: What is your "Preview Image Size (px) set to?  It must be larger than your viewer or you'll be rendering files as you go.  To be safe you can set it to your monitor's max resolution, but the larger the Preview Images, the slower they load.  You can reduce the window size of Capture One to shrink the Viewer and use a smaller Preview Size (I have to do this on my slightly aged laptop with my 4k display or images render too slowly).  Set your Preview Image Size (px) accordingly.  For this test you may want to set it to something like 2048 and make sure your Capture One window is smaller, then re-do the test with larger window and Preview sizes until you find the best that works for your hardware.
    5. Restart Capture One, opening the same Session as before.
    6. Create a new folder somewhere on your internal SSD.  Let's call it "FOLDER"
    7. Take your 500 raw images, and copy only these images to FOLDER. Don't copy the CaptureOne directory, .XMP sidecars, etc. - only the raw images.  You want to make sure nothing legacy is affecting your speed.
    8. Once copied, browse to FOLDER in your Session.  Capture One will recognize there are no Previews etc, and will go about creating the Preview Image, Thumbnail, and Mask (I didn't mention that earlier, ignore for now). Capture one will usually pop up a little Activities processing window telling you it's generating previews.  If it doesn't, you should notice a little spinning starburst icon in the very middle top of the Capture One window (hovering should tell you it's "Activities").  You can click this to view / close this Activities progress window.
    9. As Previews are being generated, you should be able to browse files slowly; ones that are already generated should open quickly.  If you zoom out to fit and flip through some of the first ones, you should find it works quickly.  Note that Capture One (on Windows, at least)  keeps your current image Preview and the last one viewed in memory, so you need to flip through 3 images to load the Preview from disk.
    10. After all the Previews are generated, restart Capture One again
    11. It should go through again and somewhat slowly identify the 500 images in the folder.  I've never timed it, but I expect that 500 images would take my computer about 15-60 seconds to fully load.  If it's taking a half-hour for you, something is terribly terribly wrong.
    12. At this point, you can go back and fiddle with the Preferences you changed / window/Viewer sizes, turn OpenCL back on, etc. 
    13. There is a very outside chance that there's something specific to the images you have - maybe that specific camera & firmware level or something.  You could always try some other RAW files to see if they're better, and then report back to Capture One.  That would be something they'd fix quickly I'm sure.

    I sincerely hope this helps you.  I switched from Lr to C1 because I found it so much faster; I shoot a lot of sports and need to very very quickly step through bursts and identify the best images.  I have had various struggles with it throughout the years, whenever I switch hardware or camera bodies or change something up I end up breaking something and have to learn how to fix it.  It's far from perfect, but I still love working with C1, and still despise how Adobe does business (and am saddened to see CaptureOne inching that way).

    Good luck, and let us know how it goes!!

    * Auto-sync XMP is, IMHO, hot garbage, and should come with all sorts of warnings that it'll make CaptureOne unusable.  I had hoped to use it to do better metadata management by using other apps that can store GPS locations etc.,. to XMP, but it slowed everything to a crawl for me. I suggest you abandon all hope of this feature if you're having any performance issues.

     

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  • William Scott

    Hi Rob

    I really do appreciate your very lengthy and detailed replies here. This is helpful stuff and I'm grateful you took the time to explain all this for me. I bought C1 a year ago and never got around to developing a proper understanding of it. Just when I'd started to apply myself to learning, COVID kicked in and my workload went crazy. Then the import and generating previews thing just put me off. I need to investigate the library aspects ie Sessions and Catalogues and the differences etc

    Anyway, I'm going to go through the steps you suggest and make sure these are all followed. Some of them ( the open GL stuff ) I've done but others I will make sure I do too. Thank you very much.

    BTW I've noticed the first time I generate previews it takes ages. After that it's not bad. Is this normal? 

     

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  • SFA

    @Rob DuMont

    I think you have the basis of the way C1 works just right.

    My understanding (as a Session user) is that the images in the current selection (something of a variable to describe since the selected Folder or Album may influence a set number of files whereas a smart album (for example) and some of the other "virtual" images groups in C1 may have to discover how many files are to be found since they are search based and would need to be assessed for results even if the last time they were used had generated a new index at that time. Things may have changed.)

    My further understanding is that, up to any free RAM memory plus disk cache constraints (what's available, what may be used by other applications, the system, etc.) the thumbnails and previews will be loaded from disk to RAM memory for speed of access when processing. Speed during processing is somewhat preferred to speed during load in that respect, partly because there are ways to limit the number of files loaded by using filters, etc.

    The Preview files are typically base level interpretations of the source images. Most of the edit changes and anything to do with output proofing, watermarks and so one will be applied over the top of the base files - thumbnails and Preview. If one looks at the date info on preview files in the session data one can see that the base files rarely change unless something or someone forces the change - re-sizing or re-generation, etc.

    One reason for having the separate simple text based edit instruction files is that that are small and changes can be written to them immediately at all times. No need to remember to "save" or "apply" changes. One can do that with a database as well but that might end up being part of the performance conflict.

    The challenge for designers taking that core concept into a "Catalog" style of functionality and adopting a wider database to support extended features (e.g. Collections and so on) is that to find a broadly utilised database product with reasonable performance and cross platform compatibility at a cost that is viable for the desktop/enthusiast market, limits the options somewhat. Too many reasons to list here.

     

    But once one has made a decision to seek out that platform the challenge is how to tune its use.

    In general one can tune a database to be extremely fast at working with applications that are mainly crunching data or very good and handling records. Image editing combined with a DAM requires both so a compromise is required. This is also true for many other commercial, business focused data analysis tools.

    Discussing this with product managers for business applications I have been involved with and working with them on performance testing across large data sets when using a commonly deployed database - such as SQLite - there was always a discussion about where the balance should be set. The "sweet spot" of performance acceptance was almost invariably around 50k records. By which I means that if the analysis work was using 50k record or less people expected almost instant results to anything they enacted. However if they understood that there were over 50k records that was "big" and if things took a little longer it was to be expected.

    If the process could deal with 5million records and return millions of lines of results in a few minutes that would be great for them.

    It is always a matter of perception, often based on how much the task being processed would take people to deal with manually.

    The other thing about perception is whether "speed" is real or mainly appearance.  Clever screen handling (even at the possible expense of real performance time) can make something appear to happen faster than it does. It is quite posisble to have a process (especially a graphical process like images editing)  that will take, say, 3 seconds to complete and then write the results to screen. 3 seconds may look very slow to the user.

    Drip feed the results to the screen with a "big bang" effect up front for visual impact and then drip feed in the majority of the real changes in ways the human eye will have greater difficulty in spotting and you can make the results look much quicker even if they still take 3 seconds to complete and be ready for the next input to be processed.

    That is perhaps one of the reasons why different people at different times may say that they find  Product A much slower then Product B whilst someone else will describe product B as being much slower than Product A. Perception can be much more influential than we are prepared to accept, both for the loading and processing of data. Data such as images and edits.

    C1, as described in some older articles from several years ago, seeks to tend towards a fast processing experience with some attempts at predicting which image might need to be pre-loaded for the next selected image request. So if one starts with images in an indexed order in memory - say file name - and moves through the list the prediction can be made and preloading memory can be applied in the background and all will likely look quite speedy. (subject to the complexity of editing being deployed.).

    If people dive around the data in a different order to anything that can be predicted the perceived speed will most likely suffer somewhat. Not so much on big and powerful system but more obviously when system resources are nearer their capacities.

    However the original post for this thread and the many of the subsequent comments are not really focussed on large number of records but some extremely slow loading of relatively small numbers of records and that is clearly abnormal.

    If it were not abnormal and everyone experienced the same issues almost no one would be using the application. We could also be rather certain that no one would be likely to claim that they thought the application was fast - or at least faster than some other similar applications.

    20 minutes to load 500 files, even if new imports with Previews and Thumbnails to be generated, is absurd. Especially for a session but even for a catalog with a large number of pre-existing imported files and a huge number of active filters to calculate it would seem to be an excessively long activity.

    (If converting from some other Catalog format, however, taking 1 minute to process 25 images - approximately 2.4 seconds per image - might not be quite so unreasonable even if it was felt excessive for the purpose. Conversion can often offer some unpredictable curve balls.)

    If working with a catalog the catalog file structure contains what would otherwise be the cosessiondb file, the thumbnails, Previews, edits, masks, indexes, etc. Even the images if they are "managed". So one might expect internal memory ot be populated quite quickly.

     

    However the experiences reported through the forum seem just as variable as ever. They range from unusably slow to very acceptably quick although what the true results are across all users is probably known to very few people.

     

    Forum reports are too often based on self reporting and perception (Pro or Con in that respect) to be considered as definitive for the entire product experience across the entire user base but 20 minutes to load 500 images certainly suggests there is something influencing the process that should not be influencing the process and does not influence the process for all user all of the time.

     

    I wonder if the Capture One crew has ever considered creating a Server based version of the application? That should speed things up more than a little. At some cost of course. Well beyond any numbers I could justify - or at least that was the likelihood last time I looked.

     

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  • SFA

    @William Scott

     

    "BTW I've noticed the first time I generate previews it takes ages. After that it's not bad. Is this normal? "

    Longer, yes because the first creation of the Preview (or a re-generation) has all the work to do. (especially for a RAW file.)

    Afterwards the core interpretation preview file exists and simply needs to be loaded to active memory and have any currently in use variables applied to it - Process recipe settings, Proof preview, Style Overviews if you happen to be playing with them - that sort of thing. Plus everything else in the Edit instruction for each variant. Possible multiple variants of the same image if you have then and they are Expanded at the time. But that calculation effort is in memory and not written back to disk as part of the preview file or thumbnail.

    However the difference, whilst potentially noticeable, should not be "ages". At least not in my experience unless something is going wrong or some system component is not working as intended.

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  • Rob DuMont

    Hi William, sorry to hear you've been sick, speedy recovery!

    Ah, yes, I was kinda answering the wrong question.  And yes, generating previews does take some time.  To be honest, I don't often notice it, as it rarely impacts my process. 

    When I start an Import with C1, I use a Recipe that creates a new job folder automatically for me.  As soon as C1 creates this folder, I browse to it in my Session.  C1 doesn't generate Previews until you browse to a folder of images, so this prompts C1 to start creating the previews while the import is occurring.

    I don't know the real ratio, but on my laptop C1 seems about 2x as fast at importing as generating previews.  This means that when the import completes, half the previews are done already, and I can start my review at the beginning while previews are generating further down the file list.  It does not seem to appreciably affect Preview load time to view files while (other) Previews are being generated.

    Personally, I often come back from a job, start up the Import, click on the folder, and then go eat or take a break or something.  So quite often all the previews are done by the time I'm back at my computer.

    Regarding C1 Support personnel - it's important to realize that these are very junior software experts for the most part, and often don't have as deep an understanding as those of us who have been using the software day-in/out for years.  Their job is also primarily break/fix support, not end-user training.  Not that there isn't a need there, but I find I have to remember the human on the other side whenever I'm dealing with support, and adjust expectations accordingly.  Properly, software companies should have "customer experience support" and provide subject matter experts, but margins are too slim and training and keeping these people is surprisingly difficult.

    Ultimately, a strong and helpful user community is far more predictive of success with a software product than relying on vendor support :)

     

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  • William Scott

    Thank you both for your good wishes. I'm much better now thank you. Right now, it's slightly more of a worry if you get a flu-type  bug but fortunately it seems to be nothing too drastic.

    RE the performance I'm sorry if I didn't make it clear but I'm very appreciative of the tips you gave me to maximise my C1 experience. As long as I know it's just the way things are then at least I can decide if want to work around the preview generation time or not. Honestly, if I accept it as a "feature" and adjust my expectations in that area, the rest of the workflow is great for me. I really like the way it processes my files and in general much prefer it to LR. I guess if I just need to allow some extra time at that stage, its not too big a deal .Probably, once I get used to Catalogues and Sessions and how to get the best from them, I should be good to go.

    I accept support is a challenge for many companies and as long as I can get advice on here and sort things out then, thats also fine.

    Added to that, maybe I've been a bit more impatient than usual lately and once I feel back to normal it'll be fine.

    Anyway thank you both for your help and I really appreciate it. Although it won't change my experience eo this issue I'm sure it will benefit my use of C1 considerably in the future.

    All the best

    William

     

     

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  • C-M-B
    Well I'd say the fix would be a faster drive and reducing the amount of photos per folder.
    If you have a partifuclary slow HDD and there are hundreds or thousands of photos in a folder, it will take a long time.

    I wish C1 would save thumbnails instead of reloading images every time you open it - but alas, that's not how it works.
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  • Robert Whetton
    [quote="NN636275244091231986UL" wrote:
    ..it can take 30-40 minutes to load the previews.
    Any way to fix it?

    What's the connection to the HDD, what brand of HDD is it?
    I use a USB3 caddy to read my drives (80-100MB/sec) and can work from it without any trouble.
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  • Levin Barrett
    I have exactly the same problem. I have broken my catalogs into calendar years to keep the size manageable. However even a years worth of photos for me is 3000 to 5000 images. When I open a year catalog, it can take 30 mins to load. If I use the search function, say 4 star or higher images, it can take 40 to 60 minutes. This is becoming unacceptable.

    I also use another program called ON1 RAW 2019, and it can load all my thumbnails from my entire collection (20,000 plus images) in less than 5 secs. Lightroom will also load a year of photos in about 2 to 3 seconds. One thing On1 suggests for optimum performance is to place the Browse Cache on a highspeed SSD. I can't find a way to do this with C1 or know if this is even possible.

    Any suggestions on speeding this up?
    Levin
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  • Ian Leslie
    Wow, that's bad. I am currently discussing the performance of displaying my catalogue's all images collection with support. My problems are no where near as bad as that. Have you opened a support case?
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  • C-M-B
    The problem is that Capture One does not save any thumbnails or previews - it only fetches the previews of the files when you open the session/catalog.
    That works for very fast drives (like SSDs) with a small(ish) number of photos, but as soon as your drive is slightly slower (like a HDD drive or a NAS drive) or there is a larger number of files involved (a few hundred or thousand) this doesn't work as well any more.

    The advantage is that sessions and cataloges are small when compared to a Lightroom catalog and they open fast - but then the images take a long time to load.

    On a sidenote: with Mac OSX this is not an issue, there the preview files are always kept due to the way the file system works (or something to that effect according to support). However I think preview files should be kept (at least small, compressed thumbnails) and images should only be (re)loaded when clicking on them.
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  • Darryl Brooks
    Yeah, I think this might be a deal breaker for me, at least until I get a new computer with SSD. It is ridiculous that the program needs to reload all the images every time you click on a folder. I tried C1 because I had heard it was faster and better than LR. It may be better, but it's unusable because of the speed issues. I'm not going to change my structure because the software doesn't work the way it should. It's supposed to be for professional photographers, so having a folder with 40k images in it shouldn't be unusual.

    I just waited 20 minutes for the program to settle down so I could filter on and export an image. I clicked to the export folder to check on it, went back to the main folder, and now I am waiting another 20 minutes. Meanwhile, I've gone into Lightroom and gotten the job done.

    It's not slow because I don't have an SSD. It's slow because it is doing a ridiculous amount of unnecessary work every time I click on the folder. The SSD just allows the ridiculous amount of work to be done faster. I waited 20 hours for previews to be built that aren't being used. I'm through waiting on Capture One so I can do my work.
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  • SFA
    [quote="DBVirago2" wrote:
    Yeah, I think this might be a deal breaker for me, at least until I get a new computer with SSD. It is ridiculous that the program needs to reload all the images every time you click on a folder. I tried C1 because I had heard it was faster and better than LR. It may be better, but it's unusable because of the speed issues. I'm not going to change my structure because the software doesn't work the way it should. It's supposed to be for professional photographers, so having a folder with 40k images in it shouldn't be unusual.

    I just waited 20 minutes for the program to settle down so I could filter on and export an image. I clicked to the export folder to check on it, went back to the main folder, and now I am waiting another 20 minutes. Meanwhile, I've gone into Lightroom and gotten the job done.

    It's not slow because I don't have an SSD. It's slow because it is doing a ridiculous amount of unnecessary work every time I click on the folder. The SSD just allows the ridiculous amount of work to be done faster. I waited 20 hours for previews to be built that aren't being used. I'm through waiting on Capture One so I can do my work.


    The previews are used but C1 will load them into memory from disk. In addition, depending on various settings, including the preview size you have elected to use vs. your screen resolution as a starting point and then whether or not you are using Proofing and a number of other factors, the preview may need to be discarded in favour of showing a freshly calculated version of the image rather than some sort of attempt to show you how things look based on the reduced size preview.

    Are you seeing a lot of disk activity due to memory swapping. If your system has less than about 12Gb of free memory (assuming you are not running anything else placing huge demands on memory as well) you might see a lot of swapping going on. However there are so many variables involved that no single piece of random advice is likely to be decisively useful.

    I would suggest you create a Support Case and have the Support team take a look at the log files to see if they can spot a known problem pattern that explains what you are seeing.

    40 seconds would be probably average. 40 minutes is ridiculous since it should be possible to work with files even if the system has not finished preparing its working memory space as it is trying to do with a view to taking a little set up time on load in order to make the editing experience positive given the amount of work it will likely be undertaking during that part of process.

    HTH.

    Grant
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  • Thomas D.
    I'll never understand that there are still people who still don't have SSDs after 10 years of their introduction. Or that people use a raw converter as image management software.

    Or they arrive with their 10 year old labtops and try to use software that is optimized for multiple cores.

    If it takes too long then buy you a pc with which it goes fast, I have to and yes it's expensive if you want to get even faster but that's why you go to work.

    I had to let that out now because it annoys me so much. sorry.
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  • Darryl Brooks
    Thank you. That was helpful.
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  • Ian Leslie
    [quote="SFA" wrote:
    I would suggest you create a Support Case and have the Support team take a look at the log files to see if they can spot a known problem pattern that explains what you are seeing.

    40 seconds would be probably average. 40 minutes is ridiculous since it should be possible to work with files even if the system has not finished preparing its working memory space as it is trying to do with a view to taking a little set up time on load in order to make the editing experience positive given the amount of work it will likely be undertaking during that part of process.


    This is good advice. I am not experiencing the same issue you have - once my large collection has been displayed once filtering and changing the filter is fast. Switching away and back is not prefect but not a full wait once I have paid it the first time.

    Your situation seems worse that mine and I am deep into a discussion with support.
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  • Ian Leslie
    [quote="Tom-D" wrote:
    I'll never understand that there are still people who still don't have SSDs after 10 years of their introduction.


    LOL I have over 2Gb of images to manage. It was only a short time ago that SSDs were even available that size. My next machine will probably have the ability to work on new shoots from an SSD and the main library on the HD. But come on man even if you bought a new machine today those of us using C1 for our library would still not put all our images on an SSD.

    [quote="Tom-D" wrote:
    Or that people use a raw converter as image management software.

    That *is* what catalogues are for.

    [quote="Tom-D" wrote:
    Or they arrive with their 10 year old labtops and try to use software that is optimized for multiple cores.

    If it takes too long then buy you a pc with which it goes fast, I have to and yes it's expensive if you want to get even faster but that's why you go to work.


    Well sure - to a point. If the software is querying or managing memory poorly you can throw new faster hardware at the problem and it will help but in the end the software is still not living up to its potential. I think we should be helping C1 find the kinks and work them out.

    That way future versions will just scream on your super fast rig. 😊

    [quote="Tom-D" wrote:
    I had to let that out now because it annoys me so much. sorry.


    Same 😄
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  • Darryl Brooks
    Can I get opinions on this laptop?

    Primarily for Capture One and Lightroom

    Processor & Memory:

    - Intel® Core™ i7-8750H Processor 2.2GHz
    - 32GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
    Drives:

    - 1TB M.2 PCIe Solid State Drive
    - No Optical Drive
    Operating System:

    - Microsoft® Windows 10 Home (64-bit)
    Graphics & Video:

    - 15.6" Touchscreen InfinityEdge Anti-Reflective 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) Display
    - 4GB NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1050 Ti Graphics
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  • SFA
    [quote="DBVirago2" wrote:
    Can I get opinions on this laptop?

    Primarily for Capture One and Lightroom

    Processor & Memory:

    - Intel® Core™ i7-8750H Processor 2.2GHz
    - 32GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM
    Drives:

    - 1TB M.2 PCIe Solid State Drive
    - No Optical Drive
    Operating System:

    - Microsoft® Windows 10 Home (64-bit)
    Graphics & Video:

    - 15.6" Touchscreen InfinityEdge Anti-Reflective 4K Ultra HD (3840 x 2160) Display
    - 4GB NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1050 Ti Graphics


    Who is making the bits that link them all together?
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  • Darryl Brooks
    Dell
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  • SFA
    [quote="DBVirago2" wrote:
    Dell


    I have a 6 year old Precision M4700.

    At this level Dell seem to make a very capable product that is also extremely strong.

    The only thing I have had to replace so far is the charger and that was because I allowed it to slip off my lap for the umpteenth time and it caught the charger connector plug in such a way that it broke the plug. Unlikely to be very reliable if repaired so I changed the charger as the cable is integral.

    I have 24Gb RAM, an extra 1Tb SSD as the data drive running in a Sata 2 speed comms card slot (it still seems fast enough). The disk are quite full and I am usually running several other applications. The ancient Nvidia Quadro GPU does not have a significant effect but is used for some things.

    I'm guessing if they are delivering with Win 10 Home it's not a Precision although the screen may well be the same as offered on the Precision. Mine is the smaller 1920x1080 Ultrasharp screen of those times.It's fine. It would be interesting to see what the 100% colour gamut of the 4k screen offers but apart from that the 4 k screen seems a little pointless (to me) at 15" size.

    Chosen carefully the latest models of Precision at the equivalent level seem to offer the option to install multiple SSDs but the battery size can make a difference in the amount of internal space available and the types of drives that can be installed. Also 4 memory slots, user upgradable.

    As you have probably worked out by now I have been extremely impressed by mine other than the 2 keys on the keyboard where the key top identifying decals have rubbed through. But I guess that's the way I rest my left hand rather than anything else!

    If it's within reach of your budget I would check out the Business section. Or maybe the business section of the Outlet operation?

    There is, of course, no certainty that my experience is typical not that, 6 years on and in different times, the products are on a par. But I think in general they are a fairly safe bet once you feel comfortable with any web forum comments and reviews you might feel a need to read.

    HTH.


    Grant
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  • Thomas D.

    Well sure - to a point. If the software is querying or managing memory poorly you can throw new faster hardware at the problem and it will help but in the end the software is still not living up to its potential. I think we should be helping C1 find the kinks and work them out.

    That way future versions will just scream on your super fast rig. 😊


    I work on that all the time. 12.0.2 is such a performance version.
    12.0.1 needed 400 GB Ram to copy styles to 700 pictures.
    At 12.0.2 there were only 50% of it left.

    You can speed up HDDs with SSDs with an Auto Tier software.
    The software takes over the management and moves the files to the SSDs that are often used or are up to date.
    I've got a software like this in testing in our photo studio right now.

    Most HDDs in labtops are 5400 rpm hard drives, these are very slow.

    If HDD then I only use Enterprise stuff.

    *I think we should be helping C1 find the kinks and work them out. * <--- yea, seems like we have a Multicore Overhead, a 32 Core CPU is slower than a 5 ghz 8 Core Cpu. But that was 12.0.1, i don't know how i looks like now i don't have that 32 Core.
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  • NNN636892422939686172
    How do 6 core chips stack up against 8 core chips? Just curious as I'm building a new PC soon.
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  • Rob DuMont
    Might be a duplicate suggestion because some of the posts above were too long for me to read completely. I have an SSD for primary use but archive to regular HDD and performance is reasonable - slower yes, 40 minutes slow no. I never use Catalogues, only Sessions, so this may or may not be helpful to you (apologies if the latter)

    Try:
    - making your preview image smaller (Edit - Preferences - Image)
    - delete the preview images from the folder structure (Sessions only?), OR, right-click "regenerate previews"
    (In Sessions, previews are in /CaptureOne/Cache/Proxies/*.cop. I think that Catalogues store previews in the database, which might need repairing - see your File menu for that command)

    Your performance sounds abnormal and as others have suggested you could also create a support ticket.

    best of luck!
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  • Darryl Brooks
    Thanks. Your reply reminds me of this post. Since posting, I have bought a new laptop with i8 6 core processor and a 1Tb SSD along with 32Gb RAM. Since then, no software, including Capture One or Lightroom has been slow doing anything. I'm sure as I get used to it, that waiting 7 seconds will seem long, but right now, I'm loving it.
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  • Paul Gardner
    For those with slow computers try "PrimoCache". The more memory you have the better it works. I have 32Gb but 64 or 128 works better. I'm getting 10,000+ read/write from my NVMe's YMMV. Computer is an Asus Z170-WS@4.0Ghz. system is on C drive Samsung 970Pro NVMe, Images are on 2 each two TB NVMe's mounted in a Startec NVMe to plugin card.
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  • SFA
    [quote="NN637018153505220776UL" wrote:
    It's not slow because I don't have an SSD. It's slow because it is doing a ridiculous amount of unnecessary work every time I click on the folder. The SSD just allows the ridiculous amount of work to be done faster. I waited 20 hours for previews to be built that aren't being used. I'm through waiting on Capture One so I can do my work.


    Do you have any evidence you can share - especially about your configuration and what you are expecting to happen.

    Without any background to what you are working with in hardware terms or even what you have done so far with C1 all you offer is a rant of some kind.

    Glad you got that off your chest but it doesn't move things on offer no useful information to anyone, least of all you since no one could begin to offer any specific guidance.

    I would guess that your apparent experience is untypical but that is only a guess due to lack of useful information.
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  • Juan Stevens
    We all know his experience isn't untypical. Try not to get on him because he's expressing his frustration. I'm a long time user and I have the same frustrations. These performance issues have been happening for a long time now. If you look at the longest threads in this forum, they are all performance related. The mac version doesn't suffer these problems. And contacting support doesn't really help the issue. My machine has higher specs than most and I still have to sit and wait 30 min for my catalog to load. It's something i try and do in the mornings so that I can work through the day. Yes I have a lot of images in my catalog. I have multiple catalogs and it still takes forever. Bottom line is we are professionals. We have a lot of images. No other software has these issues. Phase one should fix it. They don't even have these issues with their other platform. And I know others(devs) try to blame it on the PC version being written on .net. Don't even get me started with that. When I start Capture one, it accesses the directories with my RAW images. If the previews are already generated, why does it have to check every RAW image?
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