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23 pdf manual

Kommentare

39 Kommentare

  • Peter Meyer

    Hi all,

    when will there be a COP user guide?

    2
  • Jack W
    Admin

    The user guide is here: https://support.captureone.com/hc/en-us/categories/360000279017-User-Guide and contains everything relevant to Capture One 23 and older versions.

    There are no current plans to produce a PDF version of the user guide, but please upvote this post if you feel it is required.

    9
  • Peter Meyer

    Hi Jack,

    I wanted to have a single PDF file, not a web site... :(

    2
  • Gregory Adams

    As Jack says, there are no plans for an official PDF version of the guide. He acknowledged your interest in this already. 

    I'm sure they won't mind me suggesting this third party alternative guide which I have found very useful and often covers features in more detail than the official manual.

    https://rawcaptureguide.gumroad.com/l/captureone23guide

    Not paid to promote this but you might find it of use. Upgrades for future versions are offered at half price as well which is welcome. 

    -1
  • Peter Meyer

    Hi Gregory,

    sorry but I paid already for the software once and there was always a single pdf manual until version 22.

    And I really exspect an user guide from a "state of art" software...

    1
  • Gregory Adams

    No need to apologise. Just making an alternative suggestion.

    Just a polite and further reminder that there is a user guide provided. It just isn’t in pdf format.

    0
  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    And I really exspect an user guide from a "state of art" software...

    Just an observation - as far as I can see, there isn't such a thing for the current versions of 

    • Lightroom
    • Photoshop
    • Affinity Photo 2

    On the other hand it seems there is one for

    • ON1 Photoraw
    •  Luminar Neo

    I haven't investigated beyond that.

    So it seems that online information without a PDF is the way the world is moving.

    I can second the suggestion of the Raw Capture Guide that Gregory recommended, though I appreciate that a paid product is not as attractive as a free one.

    Ian

    0
  • Jack W
    Admin

    Peter Meyer What do you feel the benefits are of having a user guide in PDF format? We do have a user guide, but it's hosted in our help center as opposed to a single document.

    We feel this is more flexible and easier to update when required – but I am certainly open to producing a PDF version for Capture One 23 if there is a demand for it.

    Like I said, give this post an upvote if you are here and wanting a PDF user guide.

    5
  • SFA
    Top Commenter

    Jack,

    Not only easier to update but one also avoids confusion if users are referring to "user guides" that have become out of date.

    On the other hand if users are not "up to date", whether for the current version or a previous version, being able to access a pdf archive may have its benefits. Especially if the online links to older releases end up with nothing available to read.

    I'm not a great fan of PDFs but in this case I feel that User Guides in PDF form, archived for every point release, do make some sense.

    2
  • Peter Smith

    Being new to photo editing and of an age (over 60) where printed manuals were the norm, I find a PDF I can print and refer to, make notes in where not clear makes life easier.  Being able to just bookmark pages in a printed manual and swap as needed is often easier than using an online manual where internet speed and manual structure can at times make page swapping frustrating. 

    4
  • SFA
    Top Commenter

    Peter Smith

    The thing is that back in the day the product  - even software - did not really change much during a release and people would be unlikely to buy new versions more than every 2 or 3 years so the documentation (even though rarely read in my experience sitting on the supplier side for some business software) at least had a life. That helped to justify the cost of printing, etc. Prior to ubiquitous internet access at decent access speeds there were few alternatives even when PDF started to become "a thing".

    With today's "agile" development enabling quite frequent changes (not many of the fundamentally changing the most used functionality but still significant in for some people) suppliers have sought to reduce costs (and print waste, especially when there are not even disks to put in a box!) but enhance information availability by making support online friendly. Usually additional visual support - videos for example - are also created where they may be of special use. And broader support can be made available by offering links to seemingly related documents either pre-curated or via a search constructed from user input.

    All of that has the potential to be much more effective, efficient and no more costly to the producers than printed documentation. The searches potential make things far more accessible with faster discovery.

    However, to those of us with a "User Guide" background and perhaps an "off line" reading preference, the online solution does not always appeal.

    I agree that making notes can be useful. Over the years for many products I have made a lot of notes. The trouble is that these days I can rarely find them ... on the other hand most of them would now be for products I never use so that's not a real problem.

    That said, an extension to the C1 User Account that provided a personal "Notes" area that linked to Community Knowledge Centre articles, forum posts, etc., could be quite useful. Links to some sort of "Notes" system on one's favourite internet access devices could make a very powerful tool compared to printed documentation.

    2
  • Peter Meyer

    Hi Jack,

    I want a PDF file for reading while I am offline.

    There are situations where I have no Internet access.

    4
  • Kevin Berry

    Honestly, Phase One leaves me speachless at times with their decisions or processes.

    I work for a large multinational IT company who has software thats is used by tens of thousands of compaines in the world, we have somewhere in the region of 50 products and every singleone of these has pdf manuals, some come with upwards of 100 because of the size and complexity of the software.

    Companies should ALWAYS provide pdf's, there are many reasons for this, including:

    • Internet is down in your location.
    • Working on location where there is no internet.
    • website restricted by a companies security policy.
    • Being able to read the guide at a time YOU choose to read it, having a bath, travelling on a plane etc.
    • Providing Training.
    • Being Trained.
    • Storing it locally in case Capture One goes bust/gets sold/is retired and url is no longer accessible (you did this to Media Pro 2).
    • Allows those with disabilities to view these documents in a pdf reader that would be set-up for their disability/workflow.
    • Allows the user to print and archive the information.
    3
  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    If there was a PDF manual, I would probably download it, but I note that

    • There is an online user guide to Lightroom Classic, but as far as I can see no downloadable PDF manual
    • There is a downloadable PDF Photoshop manual on the Adobe website, but it says it was last updated in 2019
    • Again, as far as I can see, there has not been a downloadable manual for Microsoft Word since 2016.

    Do correct me if I am wrong about any of those.

    So I suspect that this is the way the world is going these days.

    Ian

    -1
  • Kevin Berry

    Hi Ian,

    Here are some observations regarding those examples:

    • Lightroom and Photoshop are both Adobe products, Adobe stopped being consumer centric around the CS5 days, so prior to CC. They at this point chose the subscription method and stopped listening to their customers. This coincides with the rise of popularity and market share of Capture One and Affinity Photo.
    • Using Microsoft Word as an example is pointless. Most computer users have used Word either from School or Work and is not on the same level of complexity as Capture One, but will have had some form of training and each iteration has not really changed except for cosmetic (the ribbon/save or open files etc).
      A better example would be another complex piece of software like: SyncBackPro, this does come with a manual. Active Presenter, comes with a manual, SetaLight3D, comes with a manual, DaVinci Resolve, comes with a manual

    So casual observation on this would be, just because other compaines are doing this, does not mean it's the correct route to go down, the only compamies doing this are the ones with the least satisfied customer base. I really hope Capture One does not go the same route, I know their IT Support is appaling and I don't have the best of opinion of them (closing my support case stating there is an issue in CaptureOne that will be going to their dev's, but company policy dictates that they will not inform customers if a fix is coming or if they even intend to fix it, for me they did the latter and I was left high and dry with no working software), but I really hope they start to listen to their customer base before they start to upset them

    0
  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    No I'm not saying it's a good or a bad thing. I'm just observing that although you suggest "companies should always provide PDFs" Capture One are not alone in not doing so.

    Ian

    0
  • SFA
    Top Commenter

    "Alternatively, the number of new features since v22 (manual available at a link near you) are not so many that they could not easily be incorporated into a manual"

    So for now one might assume that the V22 PDF might be enough if accompanied by the V23 release notes?

    Or have the people at C1 indicated they are not thinking of producing a V23 Manual in PDF form?

    0
  • Geert Taelman

    I want the PDF too. In that way, I can add/edit notes in the pdf. Thanks

    1
  • Mancebo

    PDF is really important. I'm waiting for PDF. 
    I often print manual, because my eyes can't see screen too much, after all day work :)

    1
  • Peter Meyer

    Thank you Clive very much!!!

    Good job....

    0
  • Linda

    Clive, I'd much appreciate it if you could repost your version of the 2022 pdf with 2023 features appendeded to the end.  I just subscribed to Capture One Pro and was expecting a pdf manual, as seen for earlier versions.  I travel a lot and lack Internet access fairly regularly on trips. Thanks for considering.

    0
  • Linda

    Hi Jack, I would be most appreciative of a pdf of the Capture One Pro 23 manual.  I put manuals on my iPad (in Books or Acrobat) and do a lot of highlighting and note taking on them.  Also, I travel a lot, including on liveaboard dive boats, where it's impossible to get internet access.  Thanks for considering.  

    1
  • Linda

    Clive, I was able to download it.  Thank you very much.  Linda

    0
  • Jack W
    Admin

    Hi Clive Buckley hope you don't mind me asking, but which tool did you use to produce the PDF guide? I'm going to make one for Capture One 23 (and will do so for future releases) but just wondering the method you used, as it seems pretty slick! Thanks in advance. :) 

    0
  • SFA
    Top Commenter

    Jack,

    If you have opened the pdf file in a browser (MS Edge in my case) you should be able to see the document properties which contains information that may be of use to you.

    There are a number of products that appear to support mass-production of pdf-based documents from existing documents (so long as they have not been protected and made non-editable). 

    Historically standards for this sort of activity were often lax and after a few iterations, the internal data for a pdf file could be a complete mess. It might look ok but working with it in any way to make changes or extract sections could be a fraught experience.

    Hopefully more recent standards and software updates from Adobe and those using its technology will have consigned such concerns to history.

    Your challenge, should you wish to accept it, is to come up with a process that allows revised and up-to-date sections of the individual User Guide pages available on-line to be quickly identified and used for new PDF User Guide updates on a release-by-release basis. 

    In theory it should be possible to do it with very little effort once set up. If it isn't the entire Office Automation Industry effort of the past 30+ years has been a complete failure!

    That said ... one has to wonder why, as per Ian Wilson's earlier observations, Adobe do not appear to be following a policy of making PDF versions of User Guides available for their own products.

    My guess would be that they have recognised that an astonishingly small number of people actually read user guides or refer to them for most software applications. Indeed recent generations, raised on mobile devices with apps designed to be used without being understood, may be guiding people away from reading UGs simply because they nearly always have the options of on-line access to assistance via something like a "Community"  or to a library of helpful articles.

    Something similar to that which Zen Desk sets out to provide.

    Personally I like the idea of a reasonably up-to-date portable user guide in some cases. But I recognise from past experience working on the supplier side that the effort that goes into such works may only be appreciated by a very small proportion of the user base. Often only when they have a situation that is rare in their experience  - the one day in a decade when having had the forethought to download the most recent version of the User Guide they have a reason to refer to it.

    I have recognised that situation both as a supplier dealing with customers and as a consumer of User Guide information when direct access online was impractical at the moment of perceived need.

    On the other side, about 20 years ago I and a couple of friends spent several hours over a number of days trying to work out how to do something in Photoshop. We had the nicely printed PS User Guide with lots of glossy pictures and still failed to achieve what seemed to be a relatively simple objective.

    Producing documentation that keeps everyone satisfied is quite an art and very definitely a balancing act.

    0
  • Jack W
    Admin

    Clive Buckley Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly. I don't have a license for Affinity Publisher, but it's good to know your method and I'll bear this in mind when creating it for Capture One 23.

    The UI change affected this, but I think we're in a good spot to produce a PDF document. Will let you know when it's done!

    Thanks again.

    0
  • Linda

    I love this idea. It is important to me to have offline access to latest guidebook and this solution would allow us to see all content within the relevant section, rather than viewing 2022 content offline and then searching the appended stuff at the back for anything that’s different. Yes, please!

    0
  • SFA
    Top Commenter

    There must be comprehensive software packages out there that, with a little but of forward planning maybe, could simply grab the files/content used to create the online help documentation and create a PDF from it. 

    At a concept level all that is required is a list of documents (basically the index of the existing online documentation)  and a recipe to grab that and make a single PDF file with compression applied, indexation and, hopefully, fully searchable text.  The recipe would just need to know where the data is to be found.

    Then don't change too much too often and have a strategy for making updates simple at the time of a major release.

    At mid-version releases simply use a flag to indicate a changed or added document and regenerate as needed. Or just include extra addendum pages and make a note in the landing page that there may be some new stuff to discover.

    I'm fairly sure Adobe and Microsoft Office will offer something that goes a long way down that road. Perhaps even travels the full journey. No doubt there will be others too - Affinity for example.

    0
  • Shashikant Agarwal

    Another vote for a PDF version of the manual. I found it very useful to read the manual by itself on an iPad without actually using the software at the same time.

    2
  • Alan Rew

    The HUGE benefit of a PDF manual is being able to do a free text search for a term you want to find references to, instead of having to navigate a large hierarchy of pages looking for the information you need. My new camera, a Fujifilm X-T5, has a very large manual but saerching it is easy in the PDF provided.

    This aspect of a PDF format manual is hard to beat.

    Another issue with an HTML manual is that you need to be online *all the time* in order to use it. I like to browse the manual for a new product on my phone offline sometimes, when I'm in learning mode. In any case, my internet connection can fail sometimes & it's a real pain not being able to access the manual.

    The only alternative I can think of is an online-only one, which is to use Google to search the capture one website by specifying 

    site:support.captureone.com

    and hope that you can find hits within the actual manual, as opposed to marketing information about Capture One :-)

    There used to be tools that can automatically convert HTML manuals into PDF format, but I've not looked at this for a long time. I have previously developed a software user manual using RoboHelp, which is an excellent product enabling manual content to be output as PDF, Windows Help, and HTML.

    0

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