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Export RAW to JPG Full Size

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8 comments

  • John Friend
    Top Commenter

    Does the image have any crop, lens distortion corrections or keystone corrections applied to it?

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  • FirstName LastName

    I have not changed any of the resolution settings.

    NOTE: I am new to C1 and have not used it very much yet.

    I checked in the Shape menu and looks like the size is there

    Not sure how they got altered to the lower values. JPG files which were captured at the same time (Camera set to capture RAW and JPG same time )

    Camera is Nikon Z7ii 

    JPG files show the size as Normal , RAWs show as different values

    DSC2923.NEF 5137 x 7706
    DSC2923.JPG 5504 x 8256

    DSC2922.NEF 5129 x 7694
    DSC2922.JPG 5504 x 8256

    Some Raw files are Normal full size.

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  • FirstName LastName

    Looks like it is related to Lens correction/Distortion

    Distortion is set 100 and if I drop it to Zero it restores the size to full.

    Also unchecking Hide Distortion shows the crop applied by C1

    Just checked my other lens and it seems to have less distortion and hence does not get cropped or only slightly.

     

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  • John Friend
    Top Commenter

    This is expected.  Applying lens correction has to undistort the image and that costs some pixels around the edges.

    2
  • FirstName LastName

    Thanks I was not aware of this feature until now. (in C1)

    As I have only been using Lightroom. But after a short demo at a Photo Show Yesterday, he suggested that Capture one works better with RAW files and has better color etc. So I started using C1 again.

    and it looks like the results of RAW to JPG (with just default settings) is already showing better results.

    When I look at images from my other lens (Nikon Z85 f/1.8) the distortion is not as large compared to my Z24-70 f/4 lens (which was the one I started comparing images from today.

    I fully understand that Zoom vs fixed focal will have different distortions etc.

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  • John Friend
    Top Commenter

    There's also a trend in lens design these days where zoom lenses get better performance across their range when combined with more computational fixes (like distortion).  This allows the lens designers to concentrate more on the things that can't easily be fixed computationally given the $$ and size budget they are designing to.  This isn't only for zoom lenses, but the effect may be more pronounced for zoom lenses since they have to perform over a much greater range.

    So, a modern designed zoom may benefit more from computational distortion correction than an older lens because it was designed to anticipate that the image would be "fixed" for distortion in camera (for JPEGs) or in RAW processing whereas the older lenses weren't and thus had to compromise other factors to get OK distortion out of the camera.

    FYI, I find that using the manufacturer's lens profile (that is built into the lens and passed as metadata in the RAW file and selectable in Capture One) works much, much better for my Nikon 24-70 f/4 lens than the Capture One provided lens profile.  Its most noticeable to me for light falloff in the corners when shooting at larger apertures (visible in skies).  You should try both profiles to see for yourself.

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  • Sharon Leibel
    Moderator

    John Friend Thanks for these insights! It's very educating.

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  • AD

    To add something to this discussion: If you buy a zoom lens, always take care, that the value for the beginning aoerture is as low as possible. I shoot with a Nikon Z 14-24 mm 1:2,8 S, there is no distorsion, no loss of sharpness, nothing of that at all. If you compare the Z lenses 24-70 mm 1:2,8 S to the Z 24-70 mm 1:4 there is a serious difference in the results (and of course the prices for both lenses differ very much).... All Z lenses of the so called S Line (professional line) are fantastic with spectular results, you never ever have to apply something like lens correction, it´s completely unnecessary. So for a professional it´s always better to invest in a good lens (I partly shoot with lenses that are 20 years old or older) than to be angry about unperfect results and having spent money for less quality....

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