Skip to main content

Why not an option for zooming out?!

Comments

17 comments

  • Thomas Kyhn
    I'm not sure how far you want to zoom out, but you could use the 'To Fit' option and then zoom out further if necessary. Using shortcuts this should be reasonably quick.
    0
  • Ian Wilson
    thomaskyhn wrote:
    I'm not sure how far you want to zoom out, but you could use the 'To Fit' option and then zoom out further if necessary. Using shortcuts this should be reasonably quick.

    There isn't an option to zoom out further than the To Fit setting.

    However...

    You could use the proof margin feature. Go to Preferences>Appearance. There is a slider for setting the margin your usually see in the viewer, and also a slider for the proof margin. I have the margin set to 3 px and the proof margin set to 75 px. When I click the proof margin button on the toolbar, I see a 75px border all the way round the preview. I could easily set that preference to be much more: it goes all the way up to 900 px (not practical on my screen, but available). If you used that, you could see your image zoomed out a lot more when you click the button, and back to Fit Screen when you toggle it off again.

    Ian
    0
  • Thomas Kyhn
    Ian3 wrote:
    thomaskyhn wrote:
    I'm not sure how far you want to zoom out, but you could use the 'To Fit' option and then zoom out further if necessary. Using shortcuts this should be reasonably quick.

    There isn't an option to zoom out further than the To Fit setting.

    You're right.
    0
  • Clau_S
    The second viewer (F10) is another option. To see an image "zoomed out" just resize it and the image will fit the new window size. Another option is to step back from the monitor. It seems stupid but as a painter it's the only thing I can do to evaluate my works. I do that with photographs too 😂
    0
  • Bhas H

    Workarounds for zoom out is not the best. Lightroom can do this. Just resizing the window [of the software] is the best way to deal with that at the moment in my opinion. Stepping back of the monitor is not a solution because the corrections appear differently when the image is smaller, the blacks are more condensed; this is why it's important to zoom out in order to know the effects of the corrections at all sizes.

    0
  • Clau_S

    Workarounds are not a solution but the only things we can use at the moment. Another one is to create a "Zoom out" recipe. Create a new recipe and set the scale value to anything but Fixed, Dimension or Width x Height. Set the pixel to a low value (one smaller than the corresponding monitor resolution) to output a low res image. Enabling the recipe proof (spectacles icon) would resize the image on screen. You can then ALT+Scroll wheel on the pixel value  to "zoom" in and out resizing the output.

    0
  • Rob_S

    I agree this would be very useful. I find I need it when using a circular gradient mask as a custom vignette, often the control points go off screen so they are no longer editable. Not a problem with Lightroom so I'm still in limbo for a lot of workflow as to whether I'll edit in C1 or LR.

    0
  • David Eagle

    Seems such a simple thing to enable, lets hope this is sorted in the upcoming 2021 version!

     

    0
  • Mads Hagbarth Damsbo

    Ohh yes, please. An option to zoom out to your desire. 

    It's hard to judge a photo that the client is going to see on their phone.

    0
  • SFA

    Actually is is easy to set for a size and resolution although for a specific phone specification it may be a little more difficult - especially trying to allow for whatever the phone does to the image before displaying it.

    Basically you can use the Output recipes and and proof profiling.

    What you might see on a phone looking at an image delivered by another app or an on-line photo gallery service is a different matter entirely since you have no real control over whatever the service does to your image before the users sees it.

    0
  • Mads Hagbarth Damsbo

    Well, it's not so much about having a specific aspect ratio, resolution or the final proofing.

    It more about judging your crop/post-framing, color tweaks and adjustments in full screen, zoomed in, zoomed out, flip, flop, to see how it works in different conditions, It's just a natural part of the process. 

    Like Ian mentioned, the "Proof margin" option is exactly the feature we want, just... well not inside the options menu but as a native part of the "zoom" so you can see your photo with a ton of white space surrounding it.

     

     

    0
  • SFA

    So Proofing then!

    0
  • Mads Hagbarth Damsbo

    Yes, if the idea of being able to zoom in and out on a photo is proofing to you, then i fully agree :)

    0
  • SFA

    No, but proofing offers greater control since it can take into account sharpening requirements aligned to the output required. And it fixes for the size irrespective of zoom level even when the source files one might be working with have different original dimensions.

    Plus you could very quickly change between different sizes  - eg. typical phone screen sizes, tablet screen sizes and social media requirements simply be selecting a different recipe. All of that taking cropping into account. And sharpening settings.

    0
  • Mads Hagbarth Damsbo

    Don't get me wrong, i fully agree. Proofing is always the final step for me as well both for print and display, and i use it from time to time to judge things. But it's not a replacement for being able to zoom out, just as you don't use proofing for zooming in.

    Zooming in you judge the details, zooming out you judge composition, framing etc. You just want things to flow when you are in the creative process and not having to turn on custom modes, changing panes and select profiles to do something simple like zooming out.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    0
  • SFA

    Hi Mads,

    I understand what you are saying and it is exactly the way I would expect to do things because since the earliest days of computers, GUI zooming and the use of a mouse with a wheel, it has always been done that way. We are conditioned to it.

    But in fact, for your stated purpose and to cover several aspects of that purpose that are mostly not connected in people's workflow but could be, I think the Proofing option offers faster and wider scope with greater accuracy and less effort. Or at least it does once you have some suitable recipes set up for your purpose. None of which should take very long to create. And once created probably rarely need to be changed. 

    Better still if you edit with Proofing active you get edit directly to the optimum settings for the output size required. This is especially useful when certain colours are dominant.

    If you are using web based apps this all probably becomes unnecessary since they will do their own thing anyway with whatever you send to them.

    0
  • Karl Petersson

    There is actually a further reason for adding a zoom out option.

    Sometimes when I am using the heal tool on an edge C1 will sometimes select an arean outside or on the very edge of the image of for sampling and I can't reach it since it is outside and I have to step back in history rather then just select the sampling marker and delete it or better yet move it to an era where I wish to sample.

    But I agree that I would like to be able to view the image at smaller then the fit option sometimes for better overview.

    0

Please sign in to leave a comment.