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Catalogue or session?

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16 comments

  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter
    I use Sessions. One possibility (which is what David Grover who presents the online webinars says he does) is to use a session in the first instance, and then import them into your catalog once you have finished work on that session. (You could still do more work on the images in the catalog after doing that, but this can give you the best of both worlds.)

    Ian
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  • cdc
    For professional work where you're shooting a particular subject for a particular client sessions is the better option. It is streamlined and everything from one job is in one place with nothing else to get in the way.

    For personal work I find a catalog approach to be more fitting. Often in personal work the same or similar subjects are photographed repeatedly over a long period of time so it makes sense to continually add them to the same catalog.

    I use both methods though my personal work catalog is in Lightroom, and I use only sessions in Capture One.
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  • NN635277664688003790UL
    I would prefer to use the Catalog but I find it has a major drawback for me that means I have to stick with Session(s).

    The drawback is that settings and previews are stored in a single file. For my images this would result in a single file of around 10GB size. This means the making a single change to any image in the catalog would result in the catalog being updated and my cloud backup system would have to send the entire 10GB file to my cloud drive. Fine if you have a fast Google Fibre like connection but not if you rely on an ADSL connection of 2Mb/s upload.

    If Phase had implemented their catalog like Adobe did for Lightroom this wouldn't be a problem. Lightroom uses 2 files - one for the settings and a seperate one for image previews. My Lr previews file is 9GB but the settings file is only 39Mb. Since the previews can be re-generated there is no need to back them up so I only have to send the 39MB settings file to the cloud instead of 10GB.
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  • Peter.Brockhausen
    NN635277664688003790UL wrote:

    The drawback is that settings and previews are stored in a single file.


    Are you using Windows as operating system? (I don't know, how it looks like on windows).

    But, at least on MacOS, previews, thumbnails, masks, ... are all stored in separate files, one per image. The catalog file is rather small.
    To see all the files, use "show package details" (right click) on the "capture one catalog".
    If this is a problem for your backup strategy, then use a different backup software.

    --peter
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  • Ian Leslie
    Ian3 wrote:
    One possibility ... is to use a session in the first instance, and then import them into your catalog once you have finished work on that session. (You could still do more work on the images in the catalog after doing that, but this can give you the best of both worlds.)


    This is what I am doing - best of both worlds.
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  • Ivo Sedlacek
    What are the main essential differences between session and catalogue ?
    -1
  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter
    violin108 wrote:
    What are the main essential differences between session and catalogue ?

    Good explanation of the two approaches here (Don't worry that it is based in version 10. The principles of sessions and catalogs are the same.)

    Ian
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  • Ivo Sedlacek
    Omg, one hour talking 😊 maybe one two sentences could bring a similar explanation? 😊
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  • John Doe
    The user guide is over there : https://www.phaseone.com/fr-FR/SupportM ... tware.aspx
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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter
    violin108 wrote:
    Omg, one hour talking 😊 maybe one two sentences could bring a similar explanation? 😊

    Yes, but the webinars are generally very good, and if you want to get a feel for whether catalogs or sessions would work best for you, it would be an hour well spent.

    Ian
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  • SFA
    violin108 wrote:
    Omg, one hour talking 😊 maybe one two sentences could bring a similar explanation? 😊


    It's more subtle than than 2 sentences could communicate if the basic descriptions have not helped you.

    Personally I am reluctant to spend an hour or so of my time writing something to describe the effective differences when you could have all of the answers in the same time watching the link.

    In essence they do the same think but with a different approach to the scale of digital asset management expected.

    In simple terms if you are used to shooting commercial sessions in a studio (and especially if using the camera(s) tethered, you will understand a session concept and it you are not in need of anything like that but are used to the ways of, say, Aperture or Lightroom, then the Catalog concept will seem more familiar. But once you know both approaches to some extent you will find that there is not really a fundamental difference in the processing at image level - it's all about the DAM and even that it quite similar in many ways.


    HTH.


    Grant
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  • Richard Waine
    I have found that sessions makes life a lot easier. When creating a new session, a new file tree is created, with related file folders and a C1 database file. When your session is complete, and are ready to manage your digital files, you can drag and drop the entire session and leave everything intact.

    For ease of use and efficiency, I'd stick with sessions.
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  • Ivo Sedlacek
    Could someone define the principle and features of session vs. catalogue ?
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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter
    violin108 wrote:
    Could someone define the principle and features of session vs. catalogue ?

    In a session, your images are stored in folders on your computer. The small files that Capture One uses to store previews, details of adjustments you make, etc, are stored in subfolders. There is a session database file that keeps track of things.

    In a catalog, previews, all the information about adjustments, etc, are stored in the catalog file, not in subfolders of the image location. For the images themselves you have two choices: referenced images (the images are stored in folders on your computer wherever you want them) or managed images (the image files themselves are stored within the catalog). One catalog can include both referenced and managed images if you want.

    Sessions are very portable - the default session template will typically have a folder (say Venice_July2018) in which there is the session database file Venice_July2018.cosessiondb, image subfolders for Capture, Selects, Output and Trash, You can move the whole lot (say from a laptop to a desktop) just by copying over the session folder and all its subfolders - everything you need comes with it. You'd typically use lots of sessions. Pro photographers might well have a new session for each shoot. Mere enthusiasts like me might have a new session for a holiday, a new month's photos, an event, etc. Easy to back up.

    Typically you might have one or only a few catalogs. Catalog files can be large, and in the case of managed catalogs very large indeed because the raw files are stored inside the catalog. More of a challenge to back up because of the size.

    If you want digital asset management (DAM) from Capture One (so that you can for instance search and easily find all your images over the last three years with the keyword "Football") it requires a catalog. In sessions you can assign keywords to images, but you could only select the "Football" images in that one session. If you want to work in sessions (which I personally prefer: I find it easier to get my head round how a session works) you need some separate DAM solution and I use Phase One Media Pro.

    One possible approach which many advocate is to start in a session and once you have finished work on that month, event, shoot, etc, import the work into a catalog. The adjustments etc that you have done will be brought in with the images. Best of both worlds, effectively. You could do more work on the images in the catalog later if you ever wanted to do more with them.

    The image editing capabilities are exactly the same whether you work in a catalog or a session.

    Hope that helps.

    Ian
    1
  • Ivo Sedlacek
    Thank you 😊

    But If in catalogue you erase images, the catalogue file naturally becomes smaller ? The advantage of the catalogue seems to be in the fact that all is included in one file only that you can easily move to external disc etc. (and you are not being ask about location of the files etc.) Seems that the only option to get separate raw files from the catalogue is to export them from inside ?
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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter
    violin108 wrote:
    Seems that the only option to get separate raw files from the catalogue is to export them from inside ?


    If you use your catalog with referenced files, they are already separate from the catalog. If you use managed files, the raws are inside the catalog. However you can actually get access to them and copy them to somewhere else. On a Mac you can right click the catalog file and choose "Show package contents". The raws are in a folder called "Originals" or in subfolders of that. (I don't know how you get to see them in Windows.) Or as you say you can export them if you want to. If you are likely to want to regularly get at your raw files separate from the catalog, that is a good reason for using the referenced method and not the managed method. Also the catalog file size is much bigger using managed files.

    Ian
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