Skip to main content

Noise Reduction Preview not working unless zoomed

Comments

5 comments

  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    No, it's always been like that. 

    Ian

    0
  • Peter Price

    Any particular reason why?  Is the only way to see the final image with NR applied, but exporting the image?

    0
  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    I think the reason is that in the preview, assuming you have a fairly large image - larger in pixels than your screen - it is inevitable that the preview has to squish pixels together to give you an image to look at. For instance if your image file is 6000x4000 (24 MP) and your preview is 2400x1600, the 24,000,000 pixels in your image are represented by only 3,840,000 pixels in the preview, so that each pixel on your screen has to represent some kind of combination of about 6 pixels from the image file. Inevitably any representation of the noise reduction would only be approximate and the only real way to tell how much you need is to view it at 100% (so the 1 pixel in the image is represented by 1 pixel on screen). 

    Also it is certainly true that the output is the real test. You might have an image that is too noisy to print full size without some work, but if you are producing output for Instagram it may look perfectly OK, because of how it will be viewed.

    You could look into recipe proofing to see how you could simulate what your output will be like.

    Ian

     

    0
  • David Beech

    This is common elsewhere too.  For example in DXO Photolab the DP noise reduction can only be seen in a preview window for a zoomed-in view of only part of the image. 

    0
  • SFA
    Top Commenter

    The same comments are valid for colour adjustments, not least because NR is largely about some form of colour adjustment. 

    The NR will be applied to all previews but may not be very visible if the preview pixel count is much smaller than the original file.

    It's exactly the same with colour subtlety in situations where the fine details that make up full colour details simply cannot be displayed successfully when the pixel count is reduced. Grass changing from a lush green at full size to a bright yellow perception when crushed to a social media sized jpg would be an example.

    It can be very important, moreso for some content than others, to process with output proofing and a profile that reflectsas nearly as possible what the final intended output  should be.

    0

Please sign in to leave a comment.