sRGB color issue

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18 commentaires

  • Luke Miller
    I see something similar with my BenQ monitor which is also an Adobe RGB display.

    When I export images in sRGB they no longer look correct when viewed on the web or on my PC in a photo viewer. This is because they are being viewed in a non-color managed application. This results in the sRBG image being displayed in Adobe RGB and the colors do not look right. To make them look correct I have to shift my monitor into sRGB mode.
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  • EvanWasHereToo
    [quote="Luke_Miller" wrote:
    I see something similar with my BenQ monitor which is also an Adobe RGB display.

    When I export images in sRGB they no longer look correct when viewed on the web or on my PC in a photo viewer. This is because they are being viewed in a non-color managed application. This results in the sRBG image being displayed in Adobe RGB and the colors do not look right. To make them look correct I have to shift my monitor into sRGB mode.


    I switched my monitor to sRGB mode (from AdobeRGB). The colors in Capture One have not changed nor have the ones in the picture viewer. I viewed the same picture on another machine as well as on my phone, and the colors match the external picture viewer.
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  • Luke Miller
    Don't know what is happening in your case. On my PC when I shift the monitor from Adobe RGB to sRGB the image colors in both C1 and the windows "Photos" application change. I have to believe your issue is due to a profile mis-match of some sort. Is your monitor calibrated? And what are your Windows Color Management settings?

    Edited to add:
    This is not unique to C1. I get the same thing when I export from Lightroom. Even when I shift my monitor to sRBG mode the colors in sRGB images are better, but still not correct. I believe this is due to Windows Color Management settings that are configured to display using my Calibrated AdobeRGB profile and has no way of knowing that I have shifted the monitor to sRGB mode.

    This situation appears to be a common issue with users with wide gamut monitors. If you view the sRGB exported images in a non-color managed application (like Photos) or a browser (most are not color managed) they will appear oversaturated due to Widows displaying them (in this case) as AdobeRGB images. To get them to display with proper colors one would have to set the monitor to sRGB mode AND set the Windows Color Management settings to sRGB (which I believe is the default). That should allow the sRGB exports to display with proper colors, but would negate the use of a wide gamut monitor.

    In my case I know the colors in my sRGB exports are correct, even though they don't display that way on my monitor, so I just ignore it.
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  • Christiaan mak
    [quote="Luke_Miller" wrote:
    Don't know what is happening in your case. On my PC when I shift the monitor from Adobe RGB to sRGB the image colors in both C1 and the windows "Photos" application change. I have to believe your issue is due to a profile mis-match of some sort. Is your monitor calibrated? And what are your Windows Color Management settings?

    Edited to add:
    This is not unique to C1. I get the same thing when I export from Lightroom. Even when I shift my monitor to sRBG mode the colors in sRGB images are better, but still not correct. I believe this is due to Windows Color Management settings that are configured to display using my Calibrated AdobeRGB profile and has no way of knowing that I have shifted the monitor to sRGB mode.

    This situation appears to be a common issue with users with wide gamut monitors. If you view the sRGB exported images in a non-color managed application (like Photos) or a browser (most are not color managed) they will appear oversaturated due to Widows displaying them (in this case) as AdobeRGB images. To get them to display with proper colors one would have to set the monitor to sRGB mode AND set the Windows Color Management settings to sRGB (which I believe is the default). That should allow the sRGB exports to display with proper colors, but would negate the use of a wide gamut monitor.

    In my case I know the colors in my sRGB exports are correct, even though they don't display that way on my monitor, so I just ignore it.


    Regarding Windows 10: it has no inherent color management, so it is up to the application to manage the colors. In CO1, this is now fully implemented, except for the thumbnails. The viewer got proper color management in (I believe) v10 update.
    So exporting from CO1 to another fully color managed application like Adobe Photoshop should not result in color shifts.
    The windows Photo app however has no full color management, so unless your monitor fits sRGB exactly, you will see a color shift compared to applications with full color management. sRGB is assumed as the monitor's gamut in Windows OS, so using a wide gamut monitor will display non-color managed images, like the ones in the Photo app, as oversaturated.

    As far as I know, "messing around" in the Windows color management panel's settings is largely useless, because the OS itself is not color managed.

    Chris
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  • Pawel Szczupak
    Try to view the photos in faststone viewer, as far as I know, it is one of the few photo viewers properly supporting color management.
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  • Gustavo Ferlizi
    Been down this rabbit hole.

    Gave up.

    Much saner now.
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  • cfocha
    Wanted to say thanks to those in this thread as I just came over to the forums to ask this exact question and I have found my answer, hope this helps those in the future:

    Monitor calibrated with Spyder
    From CO1 to Photoshop, no color shift.
    Just exporting to desktop and trying to view the sRGB Jpeg in windows photo was driving me nuts as there was a huge difference in color.

    Finally sent the jpeg over to an ipad via skype and boom, photo looks as it should.

    Now I am much more confidant that what I am seeing in CO1/PS is actually correct and the culprit for me was trying to quality check the image using windows photo viewer.

    Still trying to wrap my head around this but as gusferlizi wrote:

    [quote="gusferlizi" wrote:
    Been down this rabbit hole.

    Gave up.

    Much saner now.
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  • Gustavo Ferlizi
    😂
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  • Ryan Diver
    I have just migrated from Lightroom to C1 and have started to focus more on colour in my workflow, so please excuse my ignorance on this topic...

    Like the posts above, I notice a difference between the colours shown in C1 and the Windows 10 photo viewer after exporting with sRGB 2.1. However, when I set the recipe ICC Profile to my monitor's sRGB calibrated profile (I use the BenQ SW2700PT) the output in Window's photo viewer closer matches the C1 environment.

    When it comes to the ICC profile in the export recipe, I see the majority of tutorials set this to sRGB 2.1 for web use. Is it wrong to use my monitor's sRGB calibration profile, even if results closer match C1?
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  • Pawel Szczupak
    This is an issue of Windows. If you use it's viewer, which does care about color management, you will see the difference. Only when using a viewer, which does support CM the results will be the same. Therefore I proposed to use Faststone, as it does support CM.

    There is no such issue on Mac, as the system supports CM properly.
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  • Luke Miller
    My solution is to view my sRGB exports in FastRawViewer which is color managed and is also very useful in culling and tagging images before import. Only $20 for a license and well worth it.
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  • Ryan Diver
    [quote="pawl_s" wrote:
    Only when using a viewer, which does support CM the results will be the same. Therefore I proposed to use Faststone, as it does support CM.


    Even using Faststone and FastRawViewer I see variation between C1 and some exports. I set the calibrated sRGB profile on my BenQ SW2700PT, then exported recipes with varying ICC profiles:

    1. sRGB 2.1
    2. Embedded camera profile
    3. My monitor's sRGB calibration profile

    The only one that is true to the colours I see in C1 is the monitor ICC; which makes sense to me. But, is it safe to use a monitors ICC profile for exporting if I work between a desktop and laptop? Both devices will have different (although calibrated) sRGB profiles. With this workflow could I risk having two different 'looks' depending on which device I use to generate jpegs...?
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  • Pawel Szczupak
    You should use srgb for export. Your monitor profile is needed only for your system to know, how to show the photo colors on your display. Printer profile is needed for soft-proofing.

    It means your software takes a photo with embedded standard srgb profile. It knows, using the monitor profile, how to display the srgb standard colors of the photo on your monitor display. It also knows, using printer profile and soft-proofing, how to show the standard srgb colors on your monitor, using monitors profile, when the photo would be printed, using printer profile. 😊
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  • Ryan Diver
    [quote="pawl_s" wrote:
    You should use srgb for export.


    So I did another test and I think the variation comes down to FastStone and FastRawViewer, as it originally did with Windows Photo Viewer. If I import the three jpegs into Lightroom and C1 then the variation in colours seemingly disappears, the same is true for viewing each photo on Chrome (via my website and in Google Photos).

    If there is an issue with FastStone, FastRawViewer and Windows Photo Viewer accurately displaying an sRGB 2.1 jpeg then I need to find an alternative viewer. Something that is going to faithfully reproduce the colours I am seeing inside C1...
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  • Luke Miller
    With FastRawViewer Color Managed display is not the default. You have to enable it in the preferences.
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  • Pawel Szczupak
    Did you enable CMS in Faststone?
    https://ccm.net/faq/20748-faststone-ima ... ent-system

    Es far as I know FastStone is known for CM support, therefore it is rather strange that it doesn’t work for you.
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  • Class A
    [quote="ChrisM" wrote:
    As far as I know, "messing around" in the Windows color management panel's settings is largely useless, because the OS itself is not color managed.

    This is incorrect.

    While Windows will ignore the monitor profile data in Windows-monitor-profiles (this is left to colour-managed applications), Windows will use the monitor calibration data in Windows-monitor-profiles to influence with which white point and tone curve (including gamma) the monitor will operate (for monitors without hardware-LUT support, which are the most common type of display).

    If a monitor has more than one mode of operation (e.g., native, sRGB emulation, AdobeRGB emulation) then one needs a different Windows-monitor-profile for each respectively, and needs to manually change the Windows-monitor-profile each time one changes the monitor operation mode.

    Choosing the correct Windows-monitor-profile will ensure that the basic display parameters are set correctly (leading to a correct white point and full coverage of the tonal range) and that colour-managed applications will access the correct monitor profile data. Hue errors will still occur when using Photo Viewer etc. -- these will only be corrected by using colour-managed applications -- but getting the monitor calibration right can be rather important, in particular when using modes with different white points (e.g., D65 vs D50), or monitors which aren't very linear.

    Monitors with hardware-LUT support do not depend on Windows-monitor-profile calibration data -- perhaps you are using one of those -- but some of them (those without complete 3D-LUT support) will still depend on the Windows-monitor-profile monitor profile data, as they depend on colour-managed applications to perform the colour space transformation.
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  • Ryan Diver
    [quote="pawl_s" wrote:
    Did you enable CMS in Faststone?


    That explains a lot! Thanks for the tip! 😊
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