Skip to main content

Need Guidance on Brochure Printing - Capture One

Comments

4 comments

  • BeO
    Top Commenter

    Hi Sofiaera, 

    Can you change your alias please? (any arbitrary nick name is good enough)

    The second post in this thread shows howto:

    https://support.captureone.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/13006178493469-Please-remove-the-FirstName-LastName-default-name-from-forum-signup

    ___________________

    Color Management:

    How should I handle color management to ensure that the colors in my printed brochures match what I see on my screen in Capture One?

    Answer:
    Color management is a HUGE topic.

    The internet is a valuable source. Not C1 specific but you should understand the general principles.

    Just to mention a few basics:

    Your monitor must show the correct colors, as good as possible. This usually requires

    • A decent monitor. Ideally one which can be hardware calibrated.
    • Monitor color measurements device (aka Calibration/profiling device (Like SpyderX or Calibrite Display))
    • Calibrate (if the monitor allows it) or profile your monitor

    Find a good printing service. And then practice, practice, practice. Don't do a full brochure yet.

    Use the same service and select only a few different papers, or maybe just one, develop a few images. Do softproofing with the ICC profile of the paper from your printing service, eventually adjust your edits. Then let them print, compare the final print (always in the same light) with what you see on screen (softproof), go back and adjust and print again. You need that feeling and experience for this workflow with that service and printer/paper, because no color management is technically perfect, that includes ambient conditions. Export to JPG and sRGB. Tif and AdobeRGB can come later, if you need it at all, when you have mastered the standard.

    Resolution and Size:

    What's the recommended resolution and size for brochure images? I want to make sure they look crisp in print.

    Answer:
    That depends on the size of the print. Usually 300 dpi is the best. Make yourself familiar with "output sharpening" as prints usually look less sharp/crisp you need to sharpen more than for screen.

    Export Settings:

    Are there specific export settings I should use in Capture One to ensure the best possible quality when printing? Should I be exporting to a specific file format?

    Answer:
    JPG and sRGB. Not for the "best" but most of the time any other is not better, and to master the process.

    Dealing with Text:

    I'll be including text in my brochure. Any tips on making sure text appears sharp and legible in print?
    Answer:
    I cannot answer this.

    Choosing a Printing Service:

    Are there any printing services you'd recommend that work well with files exported from Capture One? I'm looking for a service that understands color accuracy and quality.

    Answer:
    It does not depend which software you used to create the files. Which printing service depends on your country. Choose one which at least claims regular calibration / profiling of their processes, and provide ICC files for your softproof.

     

    Summary:

    Do your research in the net. And then practice. The goal is to establish a repeatable workflow which works for you. It will take time but you will master it if you have some patience.

     

    1
  • Jack W
    Admin

    Massive thank you for your response here BeO – the only thing I'd say further is that you might want to export using the ICC profile used by the printer and combine that with recipe proofing

    0
  • BeO
    Top Commenter

    Hi Jack-W,

    you might want to export using the ICC profile used by the printer and combine that with recipe proofing

    Can you elaborate this a little bit?

    I usually do recipe proofing (softproofing) with the ICC profile for that printer, but the exported file needs to be in a standard color space sRGB or AdobeRGB. At least for the printing services I work with.

    Thanks,
    BeO

    0
  • Jack W
    Admin

    BeO Ah ok, I hadn't thought of that actually. If that's the case then I would go with AdobeRGB over sRGB as I usually reserve the latter for digital purposes.

    0

Please sign in to leave a comment.