Which ICC profile to use when exporting variant

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12 comments

  • Robert Farhi
    Hi,

    I have the same issue when I try to print using C1. A color shift, that I don't get when printing from PS.
    So, my printing workflow is : exporting a TIFF created by C1 (TIFF and RAW are strictly similar when displaying them on a calibrated display), with the same large color space as used in PS (ProPhoto, ProStar, for instance), and printing from PS, letting PS managing the printing, and after having checked that the proof profile with the right selected printer profile gives you what you want.
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  • pjshutterbug
    Interesting... While I don't print from C1 directly I'll try that workflow and let you know what I get... Thanks..
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  • pjshutterbug
    Nope, still can't get a neutral B&W using my custom profile. Now I've even tried processing/printing an image that doesn't touch C1, just LR and PS. The only way I can get a neutral B&W is to print using ABW.

    I suspect something is wrong with my workflow so, back to the drawing board.
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  • Robert Farhi
    On my side, I can get neutral B&W with my workflow without any trouble nor "color" shift.
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  • pjshutterbug
    Any idea as to why that might be? I feel like I'm looking for a needle in a haystack.
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  • Robert Farhi
    Do you mean that, even if you don't use C1, you get a color cast when printing ?
    1) Have you compared, with the Capture One viewer, your RAW and the TIFF created by C1 before sending it to PS ?
    2) Have you compared, on the same (calibrated) display, the TIFF displayed by C1 and the same TIFF once sent to and displayed by PS ?
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  • HansB
    Sorry, no idea about the color cast. Just the usual things:
    - Don't do double color management. If you do it in the software, don't do it again in the driver/printer.
    - Never use a paper/printer profile for exporting the image. They are only made to compensate the characteristics of your printer/paper/ink combination.
    - Never use a printer/paper profile for proofing. (See above.)
    - Look into the documentation for the paper profile. You need to have the correct paper selected for the paper profile to work.

    I have not printed files from CO 11.0.1 yet. But with the versions before I had no trouble printing from C1 directly on my Epson SC-P800 and Hahnemühle Photo Rag Bright White using the factory paper profile for printing. (I don't have a proofing profile for previewing in CO. ☹️ ) Same for printing exported images with PS, Affinty Photo or the Epson tools, and for other papers like Epson and HP photo papers. Prints are spot-on, B&W and color.

    I usually process 16bit TIFF files for printing, AdobeRGB. The gamut of the print is limited by paper and ink, and I don't see an advantage in using a larger color space here. (I tested it with some images, btw.)


    Regards,
    Hans
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  • pjshutterbug
    [quote="tenmangu81" wrote:
    Do you mean that, even if you don't use C1, you get a color cast when printing ?
    1) Have you compared, with the Capture One viewer, your RAW and the TIFF created by C1 before sending it to PS ?
    2) Have you compared, on the same (calibrated) display, the TIFF displayed by C1 and the same TIFF once sent to and displayed by PS ?


    Yes, now no matter how or what I print, the only way to get a print without the magenta cast is to use Epson ABW.

    And, on my monitor (calibrated), the cast doesn't show up anywhere.

    Of interest is that I made a print using ImagePrint and their profile for the paper I'm printing on. That also gives me a neutral image without any cast.

    So, at first I was thinking the printer heads needing cleaning, perhaps the cyan cartridge. But, since it (the printer) can make a neutral print, I've ruled that out. Therefore, 1) I'd guess that Epson ABW and ImagePrint somehow override the image settings but my custom profile just doesn't and I end up with the cast? And/or 2) As HansB (thank you) pointed out, there's also the possibility of double profiling somewhere along the line. That's my next tack.
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  • pjshutterbug
    [quote="HansB" wrote:
    Sorry, no idea about the color cast. Just the usual things:
    - Don't do double color management. If you do it in the software, don't do it again in the driver/printer.
    - Never use a paper/printer profile for exporting the image. They are only made to compensate the characteristics of your printer/paper/ink combination.
    - Never use a printer/paper profile for proofing. (See above.)
    - Look into the documentation for the paper profile. You need to have the correct paper selected for the paper profile to work.

    I usually process 16bit TIFF files for printing, AdobeRGB. The gamut of the print is limited by paper and ink, and I don't see an advantage in using a larger color space here. (I tested it with some images, btw.)

    Regards,
    Hans


    I think the problem is with double color managing. I need to understand that. My question is how do I not do it in either the software or the driver/printer? My default settings in PS are ProPhoto and GG 1.8. I want to try printing to Adobe RGB but when and where in the process do I change ProPhoto to that?

    I don't use a paper/printer profile for exporting, just the ProPhoto color space (which I'll change to Adobe RGB now).

    I'm not sure what you mean when you say don't use a printer/paper profile for proofing. I understand that the profile is used to compensate the characteristics of your printer/paper/ink combination but I thought that was the purpose of soft proofing in an image editor, to see what it 'may' look like with the profile. Does that also embed some color data that results in the cast?

    I do have the correct paper type for the custom profile that I'm using.
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  • Robert Farhi
    [quote="pjshutterbug" wrote:

    My default settings in PS are ProPhoto and GG 1.8. I want to try printing to Adobe RGB but when and where in the process do I change ProPhoto to that?


    Why do you want to print to Adobe RGB ? You should print from your PS input profile (ProPhoto) and to your printer, whose profile should be known (printer/paper/ink). Let PS manage the conversion from the former to the latter (disable the color management by the printer).

    [quote="pjshutterbug" wrote:

    I'm not sure what you mean when you say don't use a printer/paper profile for proofing. I understand that the profile is used to compensate the characteristics of your printer/paper/ink combination but I thought that was the purpose of soft proofing in an image editor, to see what it 'may' look like with the profile. Does that also embed some color data that results in the cast?
    I do have the correct paper type for the custom profile that I'm using.


    I agree with you. You shouldn't print using your printer profile as PS input profile, but you can use the printer proof profile to have a look at what you get in the end.
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  • pjshutterbug
    I don't want to print to ARGB. I'd seen that suggested and figured I had nothing to lose. But, no dice.. still the cast, even with PS managing the conversion and color management by the printer disabled.

    I suspect there is a profile being added twice somewhere in my workflow as when I had the custom profile made and was testing it I ran into the same problem. However, I was able to get a neutral print with that custom profile. While I don't remember how, I do remember it had to do with totally avoiding processing with C1.
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  • Tony Gorham

    I realise this is an old post. It's a double up of profile and that's a song in the printer driver settings. There's a really great YouTube bud in this, search driver profile double up, that sold get you there.

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