Easier Masking Trick for Haze

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8 comments

  • BeO

    Try eyperimenting with the flow parameter too, small values, you can 'brush in' the desired effect. Or create another layer for the small brach areas with same settings and use the opacity slider of the layer itself for easy overall reduction of the effect.

    When I started with C1 years back I spent a lot of time masking with the brush and all, lots of detail work, takes a lot of time. And that's good to get started. Nowadays I try to minimize the effort by trying to use the parameterization possibilities to define a mask, in such cases where it is possible. And by that I mean the Luma range or the mask creation using the color editor to define the colors/saturation levels in an image. Especially if I have a bunch of images of the same subject or scene, this allows me to mask the other images much faster by redoing the definition of the masks using these tools, instead of redoing the effortsome brushwork on the other images.

    Advanced Color editor: You select /tweak the areas where you want to have the mask (or where you don't want to have the mask, and invert the mask later). Use the option to show the selected colors. Once you are fine with the defined area, more or less, open the tool sub menu by clicking the three dots, create mask from color selection. A new layer is created with the selected pixels as a mask, you probably want o feather or refine the mask using the layer tool sub menu functions. Then adjust the the mask using the brush to your needs, if necessary.

    Luma range:

    This is a real mask prarameter, non-destructively for any mask you have created prior to using the Luma range. (Btw., I hope C1 will add a color editor like selection as a real mask parameter in a furure version too.) So, define your mask by just filling the whole area (fill mask function in the layer tool), by coarsely brushing an aera, or by using the color editor as decribed above, or by using a gradiant or radial mask, and then adjust the mask with the Luma range. If it doesn't cover everything, or too much, you can later 'rasterize' the layers mask which effectively fixates your previous parameterization and creates a new pixel base mask again, replacing the previous one (destructively). You then can finetune the resulting mask again with e.g. the brush, and btw. again use the Luma range tool on the new mask.

     

    edit: in your example, the branches (getting too dark) could probably been excluded by the Luma range parameter, assuming they were already darker than the haze you wanted to adjust.

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  • BeO

    If you haven't done so yet, take your time to look at the recorded webinars, much easier to learn then from reading descriptions...

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  • SFA

    As I recall Paul Reiffer deals with many types of Landscape haze using a graduated filter or two to make the results fit naturally with the captured effect using the least possible effort. His webinars are full of good ideas in that respect.

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  • BeO

    Yes, there are quite a few ways.

    One can search here for "dehaze" and find a few links. David Groover touched this too in at least one of the webinars.

    There is also YT video from an external user using a Luma range mask comparing it with LR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2js4ELed3U

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  • Okular

    "I learned a basic trick when masking that helped me out ....... When you are done and have auto filled over the haze, then you still may have gobs of the blue/gray haze that shows through the inner branches of the near pines. If you were to use your current mask level on the inner branches, your branches go too dark."

    Well, I think he was less concerned with the Dehaze function than with masking, so I understood these sentences. One way is certainly to regulate this by adjusting the opacity, but there is a better way, I think, by refining the mask (funtion in 3 dots ... menu of layers tool). In the example above I would draw a new mask over the spaces between the branches and then refine it. If you play a bit with the % value of the radius (usually increasing it) the mask will adapt better to the structures of the branches and leaves and then fills only the space in between and not the branches. The success always depends a bit on how the structures/edges are defined.

     

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  • SFA

    Okular,

    I agree with you.

    However the point of the example of dealing with "haze" is that it introduces different ways of thinking about the masking process and, perhaps, ways of obtaining the desired results (or something extremely close with a difference that only the artist will know observe) that could save a lot of time and frustration.

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  • Lostsole

    BeO and SFA, thank you, I will look deeper into the masking with colors or luma, especially where it involves haze. I appreciate the tips that were given and the links to explore and watch some vids on the process. I just barely learned the basic masking C1 can do, so plenty of room to grow. That said, I believe it was SFA in another thread that mentioned doing my snow with luma as well, but I don't think that will work due to similar leveled and colored rocks. However, the haze, quite possibly I can do this way. 

    Okular, I've not played with the refine functions. Thank you for pointing this out. I will explore these new options.

    Overall, I appreciate the support in this forum! 

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  • BeO

    Very welcome. I'm sure once you are familiar with C1 you will give some of it back to then-newcomers... :-)

    Cheers

    BeO

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