Best workflow

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3 comments

  • BeO

    You are having sessions if the C1 files end with .cosessiondb. (If the files end with .cocatalogdb you are having a row of catalogs).

    Sessions have their raw files and edits (and outputs and trash) stored in side-folders Capture, Selects, Output, Trash. If you move these folders incl. the .cosessiondb file with Explorer/Finder to your external harddrive then you will be able to access them later, even from the ext. hd without moving them back.

    If you don't need to search/find images across sessions (or across catalogs), but rather the whole shoot, then having a session for each shoot is a good workflow.

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  • SFA

    @Park Street

    I have found that using the session concept and ensuring that all original images for the session are contained within the session folder structure (I.E. in the "Captures" folder or subfolders under the Captures folder) makes it easy to copy and save and entire session to either an external drive and a second backup drive or, in my case for the past 3 years, a NAS device that duplicates drives and provides some other useful features at the same time.

    I tend not to run Backup software although I probably should. I'm not sure that it would always provide exactly the result I might want. However, if you are using a Mac and running Time Machine, backups may be a standard part of your system management.

    I tend to create a session, run the imports and get to a point where work in the session has started before making a copy of the whole session on the NAS. I retain the main working session on an internal drive because system response is faster. Depending on the size of the session and how long I am likely to be working on it I will either make "replacement copies" of the work-in-progress on the NAS at what seem to be suitable intervals or simply copy a new version of the session to the NAS at completion and then delete the previous version from the NAS. At some point the Session can then be deleted from the internal storage in the system.

    It's a crude but simple approach.

    If, later, I need to re-work a few files from the session or produce a new output file for some purpose I will probably just do the work on the NAS directly. However, copying the entire session back to the system for a significant amount of additional development is also an option.

    I tend not to be too concerned about hourly or daily backups of work on a session whilst it is progress unless there are a lot of files (several thousand) and most have required very detailed edit work.

    This is partly because I have found that in general (and especially working with SSD drives in the system) reliability has been good, and partly because experience suggests that revisiting images from an older session I often find myself re-working the edits anyway unless I am simply there to collect an existing processed output file without making any further changes.

    On the other hand, if you do not always work with sessions that are "self contained" - for example you have a session that simply links to various files scattered around your computer(s) and network environment, then the backup considerations are a little more complex and a different approach would be sensible.

    BeO has a good point about the need to find images across sessions.

    If one uses suitable Session naming and File naming methods typical general search needs can often be made possible in ways that even general operating system based searches can be effective.

    If details are added to the IPTC data and Keywords are used wisely then again, OS provided search facilities can often be very successful. 

    My NAS device offers built in options to analyse its contents and index them automatically after the files have been delivered to it as well as some Photo management applications that, to some extent, provide catalog type search facilities across all the files it contains.

    These are useful facilities if one sometimes might need catalogue type search facilities but mostly has no need of creating and maintaining large catalogues on a regular basis. 

     

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  • BeO

    SFA,

    It's a crude but simple approach.

    I like simple approaches, they tend to be robust.

     

    If details are added to the IPTC data and Keywords are used wisely then again, OS provided search facilities can often be very successful.

    My NAS device offers built in options to analyse its contents and index them automatically after the files have been delivered to it as well as some Photo management applications that, to some extent, provide catalog type search facilities across all the files it contains.

    These are useful facilities if one sometimes might need catalogue type search facilities

    Do you mean apps that search and find output files (jpg/tiff)  in the output folders across sessions? Do you have actual experience with it and can name it?

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