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Why capture one pro noise reduction is not very strong? I would like to completely remove grains from my background.

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7 comments

  • Petr Vones

    There are special AI based software for it. I use DxO PureRAW to preprocess low-light RAW files before importing them into the Capture One.

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  • FirstName LastName

    I was also thinking of third party noise reduction tools. But I hope capture one would allow users to further increase the noise reduction strength. Although extreme denoising is not always used, there are instances where it can be useful and its good to have that as an option.

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  • Petr Vones

    There are at least three available (DxO, Topaz, ON1), you can try the trial versions. Of course it would be nice to have such functionality in Capture One, but no single software is best for all the tasks.

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    Remember that you only see the actual effect of Capture One's noise reduction if you zoom in to 100% (or of course in any output you generate such as a .JPG file). 

    I suppose a lot depends on the image in question, of course. But in my experience it works quite well. Take this image (the noisiest I could find at short notice in my current session) which is a not very successful shot of a polecat in a wildlife park, taken through not very clean glass in a very dark enclosure - you can see from the metadata at the bottom right that the ISO was exceptionally high: 22,800.

    (Not the world's best photo, I admit. I have made no adjustments to it in Capture One at all.)

    This is the dark top left corner with the default noise reduction, zoomed in to 100%. There's still some noticeable noise in the weave of the basket, for instance.

    But this is the same area with the luminance and colour NR turned right down to zero - quite a lot worse, obviously, so Capture One at its default settings has made a reasonable difference.

    You can push it to more than the default settings, of course, so finally, this is what I get if I turn both the luminance and colour NR turned right up to 100.

    Not bad for ISO 22,800, I'd suggest. (To be fair, this was with a camera that is good at high ISO - the Nikon Z6ii.) Though of course as with any NR, it will soften the image a bit.

    Ian

     

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  • Petr Vones

    But you're losing too much details in the picture. AI denoising is a game changer, allowing us to use slower and lighther lenses. Thanks to it, I can use slow F2.8-F5.6 zoom lens for low-light concert pictures, usually at up-to ISO 25600 and it is still clear even at 100% zoom.

    Thet offer 30-day trial versions, try it and you'll see the difference. For me the DxO PureRAW works the best, retaining the most details in the denoised image.

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  • FirstName LastName

    I also use DXO for low light / high ISO images.  But if you don't want to spend the money or care about the details in your background, try adding layers with noise reduction cranked up to 100 and mask out the foreground.  Theoretically that should work, but I haven't seen much improvement myself so that's why I still use DXO.

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  • Alex Gubariu

    I agree. Maybe a brush for noise removal or AI based tool that can detect de luminosity levels where the noise is more visible would be useful. I think that you can use luminosity mask and apply on them the noise reduction but even by creating a preset an to apply the noise reduction by ISO value would help, 

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