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Dull photos after export

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13 comments

  • Max

    Hello,

    I think I have the same problem, look at my screenshots here:

    https://support.captureone.com/hc/de/community/posts/6695022266781-Highlight-Adjustment-not-exporting

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  • romain buisson

    I think your problem is due to layers that don't apply when you export.

    In my case it's something else...

     

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  • Leon Droby

    I also think I have the same problem.  I edit my RAW file and export.  The exported files (so far it's been JPG, TIF and PSD files) have lower contrast.  It's most noticeable in the highs but if I turn on Exp. Warning, I see the lows being affected also.

    Seems like whatever I try, I cannot get an exported file to match my original RAW.

    https://support.captureone.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/6746427155869-On-Screen-RAW-Image-Doesn-t-Match-Edit-With-Tif

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    What ICC profile does you export recipe use?

    Ian

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  • Leon Droby

    Ian,

    Not sure who you're asking but for me, I've checked to make sure everything is set to Adobe RGB; the monitor, the view proof profile and the export recipes.  The only thing not Adobe RGB is the original RAW image.  Capture One has dashes for the color space.

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    I was asking either or both of you, really. 

    Yes, I have dashes for the colour space for the original file too. Not really a relevant concept for a raw file, I think.

    Ian

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  • Robert Farhi

    I think this is related to a colour space/profile issue. The best way to proceed is keeping the largest colour space you can get (e.g. ProPhoto or ProStar RGB), in your Capture One recipe (that fixes the working space), Photoshop, and so on. Then reducing, on export, to the colour space fitting your needs (e.g. sRGB for jpeg, the same - ProPhoto or ProStar- for Photoshop TIFFs), and of course selecting the printer/paper ICC profile in the print window when sending to the printer.

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  • Leon Droby

    Initially, I'd agree that it's a color space/profile issue but I'm not so sure now.

    Unless it's called something different, I don't have a ProPhoto or ProStar RGB profile.  I've been keeping everything Adobe RGB.  I did just notice a profile "Embed camera profile".  I tried exporting with "Embed camera profile" and no difference; the export is lower contrast than the RAW.

    I wouldn't think it'd be this hard to duplicate a RAW file.

    Below are screen captures of the original RAW and an exported TIF.

    Original RAW

    Exported TIF

     

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  • Ric Cohn

    Are there any layers in your adjusted files? What Mac and OS version are you using? I ask because this has mattered in some older versions but I thought that was fixed. Leon, the grayed out highlights in you B&W tree image are strikingly flat. I'm not seeing a difference in my own files even exporting to sRGB for web so there must be some reason. I have an M1 MacBook Pro running Mac OS 12.5.1. It is connected to a wide gamut Eizo monitor.

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  • Leon Droby

    Ric,

    I'm on a MacBook Pro 16 (2019) running Monterey 12.5.1 and editing on a BenQ SW270C.

    There are layers in the images I posted but I also took the RAW image and all I did was Enable B&W, no layers.  The export was lower contrast.

    The images possibly are flat because they are screen captures, not the original images?  The greatest difference I see is with the sun spots on the ground and the sun hitting the lower, background bushes/ferns; especially on the right side.

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  • romain buisson

    Hi there,

    I can't find a solution, it is still happening on this image for exemple. The thing is that the little areas of highlights become gray when exporting (here on the yellow vegetables under the meat).   For this screen capture, I have re-imported the image in C1; the problem is the same if I export in high or low resolution, jpeg, tiff, PSD or whatever...

    Do you know how to reach directly the C1 team since they don't seem to take part of this conversation?

     

    Thanks!

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  • Ian Wilson
    Moderator
    Top Commenter

    They generally won't be part of this conversation - this is a forum for users. If you want to contact Capture One support, use the Submit a Request link at the top right of this page.

    Ian

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  • Leon Droby

    I did submit a ticket for my problem (which appears to be similar to Romain's.  Here is the body of my ticket:

    In Capture One 15.3.3.8, I’ll work on a RAW image (either a RAF (X or GFX) or a DNG (Ricoh)). I’ll get the image to where I like it and then use the Export function to create a TIF.

    What I’m noticing in Capture One is that the RAF/DNG image does not match the exported TIF. The RAF/DNG image has significantly more contrast (mostly noticed in the highs). I would think the two should look the same.

    I’ve tried exporting with different ICC Profiles and with both sixteen and eight bit and it’s still the same, the exported image has less contrast than the RAW image.

    I've also tried the above exporting a JPG file. The exported JPG is the same as the exported TIF. And neither is like the original RAW.

    I've included screen shots of an original RAW and exported TIF.

     

    And here is their reply:

    You may find this article useful: Why do the colors differ in the Viewer and on the output image?
     
    In Capture One you don't have fixed pixels, you have raw data that we scale and apply adjustments to after the scaling takes place.
    We render directly from the raw file to the final output size, so the pixels don't exist until you generate an output file, which affects what details are present.
     
    When you view at 100%, we are rendering the image as it will process at 100%. The same goes at 50% view and 33% view. At those smaller zoom levels, we are rendering that size file, not processing to 100% and scaling down. This allows you to see accurately what smaller files will look like.
     
    When you are zoomed out, we are displaying a fixed size preview (you can choose the size in Preferences). This fixed size previews will have the details present when processing directly to that size.
     
    With small details, i.e. stars, when you process/export at a higher resolution, some details can be lost in the resolution.
    You will see that when you zoom in, the image may look different. This is due to the RAW file being read instead of the lower resolution preview.

    In order to see how your image will look once processed, you should consider using Recipe Proofing and/or view the image at 100% zoom in.
    For details, see Proofing recipes.

    Denis 

     

    So as a test, I placed my RAW and TIF side by side (within Capture One) and zoomed in.  The more I zoomed in, the less the difference became.  So, maybe Denis has a point.  OTOH, it amazes me that I can't get an exported image to match the original RAW when it's zoom setting is "fit".

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